Items filtered by date: October 2015
31 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Halloween, or Hallowe'en (la contraction of All HallowsEvening), is a celebration observed in a number of countries on 31 October, the eve of All Hallows' Day. It begins the three-day observance of Allhallowtide,[9] the time in the liturgical year dedicated to remembering the dead, including saints (hallows), martyrs, and all the faithful departed.[10][11]

All Hallows' Eve is a Christianized feast influenced by Celtic harvest festivals,[1][12] with possible pagan roots, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain.

Halloween activities include trick-or-treating, attending Halloween costume parties, decorating, carving pumpkins into jack-o'-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing, fortune-telling games, playing pranks, visiting haunted attractions, telling scary stories and watching horror films. In many parts of the world, the Christian religious observances of All Hallows' Eve, including attending church services and lighting candles on the graves of the dead, remain popular, although elsewhere it is a more commercial and secular celebration. Some Christians abstain from meat on All Hallows' Eve,eating instead apples, colcannon, potato pancakes and soul cakes.

28 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Amy Jade Winehouse (14 September 1983 – 23 July 2011) was an English singer and songwriter known for her deep vocals and her eclectic mix of musical genres, including soul[1][2][3] (sometimes labelled as blue-eyed soul and neo soul),[4][5] rhythm and blues,[6][7][8] and jazz.[9][10] Winehouse's 2003 debut album, Frank, was a critical success in the UK and was nominated for the Mercury Prize. Her 2006 follow-up album, Back to Black, led to five 2008 Grammy Awards, tying the then record for the most wins by a female artist in a single night, and made her the first British female to win five Grammys,[11][12] including three of the general field "Big Four" awards: Best New Artist, Record of the Year and Song of the Year.

Winehouse won three Ivor Novello Awards: in 2004, Best Contemporary Song for "Stronger Than Me"; in 2007, Best Contemporary Song again, this time for "Rehab"; and in 2008, Best Song Musically and Lyrically for "Love Is a Losing Game." She won the 2007 Brit Award for Best British Female Artist, having also been nominated for Best British Album, with Back to Black.

Winehouse died of alcohol poisoning on 23 July 2011, aged 27. Her album Back to Black posthumously became for a time the UK's best-selling album of the 21st century.[13] In 2012, Winehouse was ranked 26th on VH1's 100 Greatest Women In Music.[14] The BBC has called her "the pre-eminent vocal talent of her generation."

"Rehab" is a song by English recording artist Amy Winehouse, released on 23 October 2006 as the first single from her second studio album, Back to Black (2006). Written by Winehouse and produced by Mark Ronson, the lyrics are autobiographical, and talk about Winehouse's refusal one time to enter a rehabilitation clinic. It peaked at number 7 in the United Kingdom on its Singles Chart and number 9 in the United States on the Billboard Hot 100,[1][2] her only top ten hit in the US.

"Rehab" has become a critical and commercial success internationally, and has been referred to as Winehouse's "signature song".[3][4] It won three Grammy Awards, including Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.[5] It also won an Ivor Novello Award for Best Contemporary Song.[6] Winehouse's public battle with drug and alcohol addiction, and subsequent death, has resulted in some of the song's continuing popularity and appearance in the media. The song has been covered by a list of artists, from Seether to Jamaican Mento band The Jolly Boys, and from Hot Chip to Lea Salonga.

In 2015, a documentary film about Winehouse was released, entitled as Amy and a performance on Jools Holland in 2006 of Rehab was featured in the film and on the motion picture soundtrack.

28 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Amy Jade Winehouse (14 September 1983 – 23 July 2011) was an English singer and songwriter known for her deep vocals and her eclectic mix of musical genres, including soul[1][2][3] (sometimes labelled as blue-eyed soul and neo soul),[4][5] rhythm and blues,[6][7][8] and jazz.[9][10] Winehouse's 2003 debut album, Frank, was a critical success in the UK and was nominated for the Mercury Prize. Her 2006 follow-up album, Back to Black, led to five 2008 Grammy Awards, tying the then record for the most wins by a female artist in a single night, and made her the first British female to win five Grammys,[11][12] including three of the general field "Big Four" awards: Best New Artist, Record of the Year and Song of the Year.

Winehouse won three Ivor Novello Awards: in 2004, Best Contemporary Song for "Stronger Than Me"; in 2007, Best Contemporary Song again, this time for "Rehab"; and in 2008, Best Song Musically and Lyrically for "Love Is a Losing Game." She won the 2007 Brit Award for Best British Female Artist, having also been nominated for Best British Album, with Back to Black.

Winehouse died of alcohol poisoning on 23 July 2011, aged 27. Her album Back to Black posthumously became for a time the UK's best-selling album of the 21st century.[13] In 2012, Winehouse was ranked 26th on VH1's 100 Greatest Women In Music.[14] The BBC has called her "the pre-eminent vocal talent of her generation."

"Rehab" is a song by English recording artist Amy Winehouse, released on 23 October 2006 as the first single from her second studio album, Back to Black (2006). Written by Winehouse and produced by Mark Ronson, the lyrics are autobiographical, and talk about Winehouse's refusal one time to enter a rehabilitation clinic. It peaked at number 7 in the United Kingdom on its Singles Chart and number 9 in the United States on the Billboard Hot 100,[1][2] her only top ten hit in the US.

"Rehab" has become a critical and commercial success internationally, and has been referred to as Winehouse's "signature song".[3][4] It won three Grammy Awards, including Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.[5] It also won an Ivor Novello Award for Best Contemporary Song.[6] Winehouse's public battle with drug and alcohol addiction, and subsequent death, has resulted in some of the song's continuing popularity and appearance in the media. The song has been covered by a list of artists, from Seether to Jamaican Mento band The Jolly Boys, and from Hot Chip to Lea Salonga.

In 2015, a documentary film about Winehouse was released, entitled as Amy and a performance on Jools Holland in 2006 of Rehab was featured in the film and on the motion picture soundtrack.

26 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Jeans Wilder -- a gritty, drowsy, lo-fi project similar to acts like Best Coast and Washed Out -- is the solo project of Andrew Caddick, formerly of Fantastic Magic. Having made a few recordings under the name Jeans Wilder prior to his time with Fantastic Magic, Caddick donned the name once again for a series of new recordings in the spring of 2008. Over the course of the next two years, Jeans Wilder had a number of split singles and cassette tapes out on various indie labels, including Antiques (Night People), a split cassette with A Gal (Bathetic), a split 7" with Best Coast ("Tough Guys/ Up All Night," via Atelier Ciseaux), and a split 12" with Jen Paul (La Station Radio). Although not a core member of the group, drummer Melissa Duenas was brought on board in the fall of 2009 to round out Jeans Wilder's live sound. Jeans Wilder's debut full-length album, Nice Trash, was released in the summer of 2010. Two years later, the slightly more focused Totally, which concentrated on Caddick's beachy pop and lo-fi excursions, arrived.

'Nice Trash' was recorded between summer 2008-2010 at weedcave one (need to go there) and 1010, effortlessly ghosting a range of classically dreamy R&B, eerie H-Pop and colder, synthier moments, always eluding concrete classifications yet all bathed in a shy and sensitive feel for teenaged pop melancholy. From the warbling electronic loops and Panda Bear-esque vocal harmonies of 'Be My Shade' we're subsumed by breathtaking drone-pop in 'Blanket Mountain', strongly reminding of that awesome Six Six Seconds 7" on Downwards or even Grouper's druggiest shimmers, while 'Don't Wanna Live Forever' moves sideways into jagged, ferric midi-funk with a strange chamber-pop finish and 'International Water' reflects on narcotically screwed and deliciously romantic synthpop. Deeper in, the eerie 50s R&B of 'In My Dreams' instantly reminds of Villa Nah's superlative Au Revoir Simone 7" remix and the psychoacoustic lo-fi mixing trickery of 'Let's Share This Space' confirm that this is a very, very special debut album for fans of all matters H-Pop, from LA Vampires to Ducktails, Blissed Out to Hype Williams. Highly recommended!

23 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Cidny Bullens (born Cindy Bullens March 21, 1955) is an American singer-songwriter who grew up in Massachusetts. Bullens released two albums in the late 1970s on United Artists and Casablanca and another in 1989.[1]

Bullens' 1978 debut album, Desire Wire is described flatly by William Ruhlmann for Allmusic as: "One of the great lost rock albums of the 1970s, Bullens' debut release is full of tough, passionate, incredibly catchy rock & roll played to the hilt and sung with fire".[2] These early albums anticipated later work by a host of 1980s female and female-identified rock artists, from Pat Benatar, to Blondie, to the Go-Go's, to Headpins.

Bullens got started in the music business by performing background vocals as one of the Sex-O-Lettes on the 1974 debut album Get Dancin' by Disco-Tex and the Sex-O-Lettes.

Bullens also served as a backup vocalist with Elton John on three major tours, as well as his album Blue Moves and his hit with Kiki Dee, "Don't Go Breaking My Heart" (both released in 1976).[3]

Bullens provided vocals on three songs ("It's Raining on Prom Night," "Mooning," and "Freddy, My Love") on the soundtrack of the 1977 feature film, Grease.[4] The performances on the soundtrack earned a Grammy Award nomination for best rock vocal performance.

In 1979, Bullens married Dan Crewe, brother of songwriter/producer Bob Crewe, and divorced in 2002. A daughter, Reid, was born in 1982. A younger daughter, Jessie, born in 1985, died at age 11, of complications during treatment for cancer in 1996.[3]

In 2012, Bullens came out as a trans man and announced he would change his name from Cindy Bullens to Cidny Bullens.

18 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Formed in 1980 in Thesaloniki. They released 2 Lp. "Grooving over beirut" in 1983 and "eastern side of love" in 1984.

13 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Paul Albert Anka, OC (born July 30, 1941) is a Canadian singer, songwriter, and actor. Anka became famous in the late 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s with hit songs like "Diana", "Lonely Boy", "Put Your Head on My Shoulder", and "(You're) Having My Baby". He wrote such well-known music as the theme for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and one of Tom Jones's biggest hits, "She's a Lady", as well as the English lyrics for Frank Sinatra's signature song, "My Way", which has been covered by many including Elvis Presley. He was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame in 2005.

In 1983, he co-wrote the song "I Never Heard" with Michael Jackson. It was retitled and released in 2009 under the name "This Is It".[1] An additional song that Jackson co-wrote with Anka from this 1983 session, "Love Never Felt So Good", was since discovered and was released on Jackson's posthumous album Xscape in 2014. The song was also released by Johnny Mathis in 1984.

Anka became a naturalized US citizen in 1990.

Paul Anka recorded his first single, "I Confess", when he was 14. In 1957 he went to New York City where he auditioned for Don Costa at ABC, singing what was widely believed to be a lovestruck verse he had written to a former babysitter. In an interview with NPR's Terry Gross in 2005, he stated that it was to a girl at his church whom he hardly knew.[7] The song "Diana" brought Anka stardom as it rocketed to #1 on the Canadian and U.S. music charts.[8] "Diana" is one of the best selling singles ever by a Canadian recording artist.[9] He followed up with four songs that made it into the Top 20 in 1958,[10] including "It's Time to Cry", which hit #4 and "(All Of a Sudden) My Heart Sings", which reached #15, making him (at 17) one of the biggest teen idols of the time. He toured Britain, then Australia with Buddy Holly. Anka also wrote "It Doesn't Matter Anymore" – a song written for Holly, which Holly recorded just before he died in 1959. Anka stated shortly afterward:

"It Doesn't Matter Anymore" has a tragic irony about it now, but at least it will help look after Buddy Holly's family. I'm giving my composer's royalty to his widow – it's the least I can do

Paul Anka's talent included the theme for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (reworked in 1962 from a song Anka wrote earlier called "Toot Sweet"; it had been rewritten with lyrics and recorded by Annette Funicello in 1959 as "It's Really Love").[12] Anka composed Tom Jones's biggest hit record, "She's a Lady", and wrote the English lyrics to "My Way", Frank Sinatra's signature song (originally the French song "Comme d'habitude"). In the 1960s Anka began acting in motion pictures as well as writing songs for them, most notably the theme for the hit film The Longest Day (which also was the official march of the Canadian Airborne Regiment, in which he made a cameo appearance as a US Army Ranger. For his film work he wrote and recorded one of his greatest hits, "Lonely Boy". He also wrote and recorded "My Home Town", which was a #8 pop hit for him the same year. He then went on to become one of the first pop singers to perform at the Las Vegas casinos. In 1960 he appeared twice as himself in NBC's short-lived crime drama Dan Raven.In 1960, Anka signed with RCA Victor. He bought the rights and ownership of his ABC-Paramount catalog in 1963,[13] but like most North American recording artists saw his career stalled by the British Invasion. By the late 1960s, his career focused on adult contemporary and big-band standards, played regularly in Las Vegas. In the early 1970s he signed with Buddah Records. After more than ten years without a top 25 hit record, he signed with United Artists and in 1974 teamed up with Odia Coates to record the #1 hit, "(You're) Having My Baby". The two would record two more duets that made it into the Top 10, "One Man Woman/One Woman Man" (#7) and "I Don't Like to Sleep Alone" (#8), and the #15 duet "(I Believe) There's Nothing Stronger Than Our Love". In 1975 he recorded a jingle for Kodak written by Bill Lane (lyrics) and Roger Nichols (melody) called "Times of Your Life". It became so popular Anka recorded it as a full song, which peaked at #7 in the U.S. pop chart in 1976. The follow-up was another hit that Anka wrote for Sinatra, "Anytime (I'll Be There)", peaking at #33. Anka's last Top 40 hit in the U.S. was in the summer of 1983: "Hold Me 'Til The Mornin' Comes", which included backing vocals from then-Chicago frontman Peter Cetera; it hit #2 on the Hot Adult Contemporary chart

08 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Modest Mouse is an American indie rock band formed in 1992 in Issaquah, Washington. The founding members of this group included lead singer/guitarist Isaac Brock, drummer Jeremiah Green, and bassist Eric Judy. Strongly influenced by groups such as Pavement, the Pixies and Talking Heads, the band rehearsed, rearranged, and recorded demos for almost two years before finally signing with small-town indie label, K Records, and releasing numerous singles.[1] Since the band's 1996 debut album, This Is a Long Drive for Someone with Nothing to Think About, the group's lineup has centered on Brock and Green. Judy performed on every Modest Mouse album until his departure in 2012. Guitarist Johnny Marr (formerly of the Smiths) joined the band in 2006, shortly following percussionist Joe Plummer (formerly of the Black Heart Procession) and multi-instrumentalist Tom Peloso, to work on the album We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank. Guitarist Jim Fairchild joined the band in February 2009. The band's sixth album, Strangers to Ourselves, was released on March 17, 2015.

The band's name is derived from a passage from the Virginia Woolf story "The Mark on the Wall," which reads, "I wish I could hit upon a pleasant track of thought, a track indirectly reflecting credit upon myself, for those are the pleasantest thoughts, and very frequent even in the minds of modest, mouse-coloured people, who believe genuinely that they dislike to hear their own praises."

It was during his teenage years that Brock, who at the time was employed at the local family video store just outside of Seattle, met bassist Eric Judy. Brock and Judy later ran into drummer Jeremiah Green,[3] who also resided near Seattle, at a heavy metal show and decided to make music together. In 1994, Modest Mouse recorded its first EP, Blue Cadet-3, Do You Connect?, at Calvin Johnson's Dub Narcotic Studios. It was released by K Records. A single, "Broke", followed under Sub Pop that was recorded by Steve Wold (a.k.a. bluesman Seasick Steve) at Moon Studios in Olympia, Washington. During this time, Modest Mouse also recorded what would have been its first album, Sad Sappy Sucker, but constant delays caused the album to be shelved and forgotten. It was not until 2001 that it was officially released. Before making their way into the pop music world in 2004, many of Modest Mouse's tours included stops at DIY/punk venues.

After moving to Up Records,[4] Modest Mouse released two full-length albums and other recordings recorded at Moon Studios, including the 1996 LP This Is a Long Drive for Someone with Nothing to Think About. This album was produced and recorded by Steve Wold (at the time Wold was assisting in the recordings as well, but was not officially part of the band). The next offering was Interstate 8, also produced by Wold. The 1997 album, The Lonesome Crowded West, (also recorded at Moon Studios, by Scott Swayze) turned out to serve as the band's breakthrough. The Lonesome Crowded West gained the band a cult following, and is now popularly considered to be one of the defining albums of mid-1990s indie rock. During this time, Nick Kraft was brought in to refine the band's sound. Prior to its release, the band had recorded the EP The Fruit That Ate Itself. In 1999, Up Records released a singles and rarities collection entitled Building Nothing Out of Something that included the entirety of Interstate 8 except for the songs "Edit the Sad Parts" and "Buttons to Push the Buttons".

"Heart Cooks Brain" is a 1999 single by indie rock group Modest Mouse, released exclusively in the United Kingdom. The single features the songs "Heart Cooks Brain" on side A, with "Shit Luck" acting as a second A-side. Both songs appeared on the band's 1997 album The Lonesome Crowded West.

06 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Lesley Sue Gore (born Lesley Sue Goldstein; May 2, 1946 – February 16, 2015) was an American singer, songwriter, actress, and activist. At the age of 16, in 1963, she recorded the pop hit "It's My Party", and followed it up with other hits including "Judy's Turn to Cry", "You Don't Own Me", and "California Nights".

Gore also worked as an actress and composed songs with her brother Michael Gore for the 1980 film Fame, for which she was nominated for an Academy Award.[2] She hosted an LGBT-oriented public television show, In the Life, on American TV in the 2000s, and was active until 2014.Gore was born Lesley Sue Goldstein[3] in Brooklyn, New York City[2] into a middle-class[dubious discuss] Jewish family, the daughter of Leo and Ronny Gore.[4] Her father was the owner of Peter Pan, a children's swimwear and underwear manufacturer,[4] and later became a leading brand licensing agent in the apparel industry.[5] She was raised in Tenafly, New Jersey[6] and was a junior at the Dwight School for Girls in nearby Englewood when "It's My Party" became a number one hit. The song was eventually nominated for a Grammy Award for rock and roll recording.[7] It sold over one million copies and was certified as a gold record.

"It's My Party" was followed by many other hits for Gore, including the sequel, "Judy's Turn to Cry" (US No. 5); "She's a Fool" (US No. 5); the protofeminist million-selling "You Don't Own Me",[8] which held at No. 2 for three weeks behind The Beatles' "I Want To Hold Your Hand"; "That's the Way Boys Are" (US No. 12); "Maybe I Know" (US No. 14/UK No. 20); "Look of Love" (US No. 27); and the Grammy-nominated "Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows" (US No. 13), from the 1965 movie, Ski Party.[9] In 1965 she appeared in the beach party film, The Girls on the Beach in which she performed three songs: "Leave Me Alone", "It's Gotta Be You", and "I Don't Want to Be a Loser".

Gore was given first shot at recording "A Groovy Kind of Love" by songwriters Carole Bayer and Toni Wine, with a melody from a sonatina by Muzio Clementi,[10] but Shelby Singleton, a producer for Mercury subsidiary Smash Records, refused to let Gore record a song with the word "groovy" in its lyrics.[9] The Mindbenders went on to record it, and it reached No. 2 on the Billboard charts.

Gore recorded composer Marvin Hamlisch's first hit composition, "Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows", on May 21, 1963 while "It's My Party" was climbing the charts.[9] Her record producer from 1963 to 1965 was Quincy Jones. Jones' dentist was Marvin Hamlisch's uncle, and Hamlisch asked his uncle to convey several songs to Jones.[9] "Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows" was released on the LP Lesley Gore Sings of Mixed-Up Hearts but did not surface as a single until June 1965.[9] Hamlisch composed three other Gore associated songs: "California Nights",[12] "That's the Way the Ball Bounces" and "One by One". "That's the Way the Ball Bounces" was recorded September 21, 1963 at A&R Studios in New York; it was released as the B-side of "That's the Way Boys Are" and appeared on the LP Boys Boys Boys. "One by One" was an unreleased track recorded on July 31, 1969 in New York and produced by Paul Leka; it first appeared on the Bear Family five-CD anthology of Gore's Mercury work entitled It's My Party (1994).[2][9]

Gore was one of the featured performers in the T.A.M.I. Show concert film, which was recorded and released in 1964 by American International Pictures, and placed in the National Film Registry in 2006. Gore had one of the longest sets in the film, performing six songs including "It's My Party", "You Don't Own Me", and "Judy's Turn to Cry".[13]

Gore performed on two consecutive episodes of the Batman television series (January 19 and 25, 1967), in which she guest-starred as Pussycat, one of Catwoman's minions.[2] In the January 19 episode "That Darn Catwoman", she lip-synched to the Bob Crewe-produced "California Nights", and in the January 25 episode "Scat! Darn Catwoman" she lip-synched to "Maybe Now".[11] "California Nights", which Gore recorded for her 1967 album of the same name, returned her to the upper reaches of the Hot 100.[9] The single peaked at number 16 in March 1967 (14 weeks on the chart). It was her first top 40 hit since "My Town, My Guy and Me" in late 1965 and her first top 20 since "Sunshine, Lollipops, and Rainbows".[2]

Gore also performed the single "We Know We're in Love" ten months earlier on the final episode of The Donna Reed Show, which aired on March 19, 1966.[9]

After high school, while continuing to make appearances as a singer, Gore attended Sarah Lawrence College, studying British and American English literature. At college, folk music was popularly lauded as 'chic' whereas pop music was often derided as 'uncool.'[2] "Had I been tall with blonde hair, had I been Mary Travers, I would have gotten along fine."[14] She graduated in 1968.

02 Oct
Published in Song of 2day

Nada Surf is an American alternative rock band which consists of Matthew Caws (guitar, vocals), Ira Elliot (drums, backup vocals), Doug Gillard (lead guitar) and Daniel Lorca (bass, backup vocals). Based in New York and formed in the 1990s, Nada Surf continues to tour, and their most recent studio album, The Stars Are Indifferent To Astronomy, was released in 2012.

In 1992, the band was formed by Matthew Caws and Daniel Lorca. Concerning the band's name, Matthew said, "it's actually referring to something much more existential, it's just surfing on nothing. Being lost in your head or in your imagination but you know, whenever I listen to music I always find myself off somewhere. Somewhere in space. You know, in mental space and it's a reference to that."[1] They met in the Lycée français de New York; both spent some of their childhood in France and Belgium, and played in many bands, including The Cost of Living and Because Because Because. Their first drummer, Dan (later alluded to in the song "The Plan" from the album High/Low), was replaced by Aaron Conte, with whom the band recorded its first 7", The Plan/Telescope (1994/Stickboy), as well as the demo tape Tafkans, the raw version of High/Low. Those raw versions were later released on their second 7", Deeper Well/Pressure Free (1995/Deep Elm Records), on the Karmic EP and on North 6th Street.

In 1995, Conte left the band and was replaced by Ira Elliot, former drummer of the Fuzztones, a very active band of the eighties NYC scene, and of whom both Caws and Lorca were fans. After a show at the Knitting Factory, Nada Surf met former Cars frontman and Weezer producer Ric Ocasek. With little hope, they presented him with a copy of Tafkans. Three weeks later, Ocasek called back with news of his intention to produce the band's album. At the same time, the band was finalizing a contract with Elektra Records, through an executive, Terry Tolkin, who was working for its indie branch, No.6 Records, on which their release, the Karmic EP had been released the same year. Negotiations with Elektra did not pan out, so Ocasek connected the band with Maverick Records. The band flew to Los Angeles for a hectic audition; Caws had the flu, and they had to rent gear.[2]

In 1996, the band released High/Low, their debut album which was recorded and mastered within a 19-day period. The recording was paid for by Elektra before the band signed its contract that January. That summer, as Nada Surf toured the United States with Superdrag, their song "Popular" became a summer anthem, and the band toured overseas.

"Popular" is a song by Nada Surf and the first single from their debut album High/Low. Each of the verses in '"Popular" presents, in spoken word format, sarcastic advice to teens. Initially offered in a calm, deadpan voice, the lyrics gradually build Kinison-style in teen angst and rage.

The song reached number 11 on the U.S. Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart and propelled the album to number 63 on the Billboard 200. "Popular" was also a big hit in France, reaching the Top 10 with a total chart run of 15 consecutive weeks in the French Top 50. It was also used in France in a TV commercial for the radio station Fun Radio, which was then the most influential radio station among teenagers.The whole song, except for the chorus, are parts made up from the 1964 teen advice book Penny's Guide to Teen-Age Charm and Popularity, written by television actress Gloria Winters. The excerpts are spoken in a sarcastic tone by Matthew Caws. A rerecorded version from 2007 appears on the band's MySpace.

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