Items filtered by date: November 2015
29 Nov
Published in Song of 2day

Del Shannon (born Charles Weedon Westover; December 30, 1934 – February 8, 1990) was an American rock and roll and country musician, and singer-songwriter who is best known for his 1961 No. 1 billboard hit "Runaway".

He flew to New York City, but his first sessions were not successful. McLaughlin then persuaded Shannon and Crook to rewrite and re-record one of their earlier songs, originally called "Little Runaway", using the Musitron as lead instrument. On 21 January 1961, they recorded "Runaway", which was released as a single in February 1961, reaching #1 in the Billboard chart in April. Shannon followed with "Hats Off to Larry", which peaked at #5 (Billboard) and #2 on Cashbox in 1961, and the less popular "So Long, Baby", another song of breakup bitterness. "Runaway" and "Hats Off to Larry" were recorded in a day.[3] "Little Town Flirt", in 1962 (with Bob Babbitt), reached #12 in 1963, as did the album of the same title. After these hits, Shannon was unable to keep his momentum in the U.S., but continued his success in England, where he had always been more popular. In 1963, he became the first American to record a cover version of a song by the Beatles: his "From Me to You" charted in the US before the Beatles' version.

By August 1963, Shannon's relationship with his managers and Bigtop had soured, so he formed his own label, Berlee Records, named after his parents[4] and distributed by Diamond Records. Two singles were issued: the apparently Four Seasons-inspired "Sue's Gotta Be Mine" was a moderate hit, attaining #71 in the US, and #21 in the UK (where Shannon's records continued on the London label). The second single, "That's the Way Love Is", did not chart, and Shannon patched things up with his managers soon after. In early 1964, he was placed on Amy (Stateside in the UK) and the Berlee label disappeared.[citation needed]

He returned to the charts immediately with "Handy Man" (a 1960 hit by Jimmy Jones), "Do You Wanna Dance?" (a 1958 hit by Bobby Freeman), and two originals, "Keep Searchin'" (#3 in the UK; #9 in the US), and "Stranger in Town" (#40 in the UK). In late 1964, Shannon produced a demo recording session for a young fellow Michigander named Bob Seger, who would go on to stardom much later. Shannon gave acetates of the session to Dick Clark (Del was on one of Clark's tours in 1965), and by 1966, Bob Seger was recording for Philadelphia's famed Cameo Records label, resulting in some regional hits which would eventually lead to a major-label deal with Capitol Records. Also in late 1964 Shannon paid tribute to one of his own musical idols with Del Shannon Sings Hank Williams (Amy Records 8004). The album was recorded in hardcore country honky-tonk style and no singles were released. Shannon opened with Ike and Tina Turner at Dave Hull's Hullabaloo in Los Angeles, California, on December 22, 1965.Suffering from depression, for which he was taking Prozac, Shannon committed suicide on February 8, 1990, killing himself with a .22-caliber rifle at his home in Santa Clarita, California. He was cremated, and his ashes were scattered. Following his death, the Traveling Wilburys honored him by recording a version of "Runaway". Lynne also co-produced Shannon's posthumous album, Rock On, released on Silvertone in 1991.

26 Nov
Published in Song of 2day

Dennis Emmanuel Brown CD (1 February 1957 – 1 July 1999) was a Jamaican reggae singer. During his prolific career, which began in the late 1960s when he was aged eleven, he recorded more than 75 albums and was one of the major stars of lovers rock, a subgenre of reggae. Bob Marley cited Brown as his favourite singer,[1] dubbing him "The Crown Prince of Reggae", and Brown would prove influential on future generations of reggae singers.

Dennis Brown was born on 1 February 1957 at Jubilee Hospital in Kingston, Jamaica.[4] His father Arthur was a scriptwriter, actor, and journalist, and he grew up in a large tenement yard between North Street and King Street in Kingston with his parents, three elder brothers and a sister, although his mother died in the 1960s.[4][5] He began his singing career at the age of nine, while still at junior school, with an end-of-term concert the first time he performed in public, although he had been keen on music from an even earlier age, and as a youngster was a keen fan of American balladeers such as Brook Benton, Sam Cooke, Frank Sinatra, and Dean Martin.[4] He cited Nat King Cole as one of his greatest early influences.[4] He regularly hung around JJ's record store on Orange Street in the rocksteady era and his relatives and neighbours would often throw Brown pennies to hear him sing in their yard.[4] Brown's first professional appearance came at the age of eleven, when he visited a local club where his brother Basil was performing a comedy routine, and where he made a guest appearance with the club's resident group, the Fabulous Falcons (a group that included Cynthia Richards, David "Scotty" Scott, and Noel Brown).[4] On the strength of this performance he was asked to join the group as a featured vocalist.[4] When the group performed at a JLP conference at the National Arena, Brown sang two songs - Desmond Dekker's "Unity" and Johnnie Taylor's "Ain't That Loving You" - and after the audience showered the stage with money, he was able to buy his first suit with the proceeds.[4] Bandleader Byron Lee performed on the same bill, and was sufficiently impressed with Brown to book him to perform on package shows featuring visiting US artists, where he was billed as the "Boy Wonder".[4]

As a young singer Brown was influenced by older contemporaries such as Delroy Wilson (whom he later cited as the single greatest influence on his style of singing),[6] Errol Dunkley, John Holt, Ken Boothe, and Bob Andy.[4] Brown's first recording was an original song called "Lips of Wine" for producer Derrick Harriott, but when this was not released, he recorded for Clement "Coxsone" Dodd's Studio One label, and his first session yielded the single "No Man is an Island", recorded when Brown was aged twelve and released in late 1969.[7] The single received steadily increasing airplay for almost a year before becoming a huge hit throughout Jamaica.[7] Brown recorded up to a dozen sessions for Dodd, amounting to around thirty songs, and also worked as a backing singer on sessions by other artists, including providing harmonies along with Horace Andy and Larry Marshall on Alton Ellis's Sunday Coming album.[7][8] Brown was advised by fellow Studio One artist Ellis to learn guitar to help with his songwriting, and after convincing Dodd to buy him an instrument, was taught the basics by Ellis.[7] These Studio One recordings were collected on two albums, No Man is an Island and If I Follow my Heart (the title track penned by Alton Ellis), although Brown had left Studio One before either was released.[9] He went on to record for several producers including Lloyd Daley ("Baby Don't Do It" and "Things in Life"), Prince Buster ("One Day Soon" and "If I Had the World"), and Phil Pratt ("Black Magic Woman", "Let Love In", and "What About the Half"), before returning to work with Derrick Harriott, recording a string of popular singles including "Silhouettes", "Concentration", "He Can't Spell", and "Musical Heatwave", with the pick of these tracks collected on the Super Reggae and Soul Hits album in 1973.[10] Brown also recorded for Vincent "Randy" Chin ("Cheater"), Dennis Alcapone ("I Was Lonely"), and Herman Chin Loy ("It's Too Late" and "Song My Mother Used to Sing") among others, with Brown still at school at this stage of his career.

In 1972, Brown began an association that would result in his breakthrough as an internationally successful artist; He was asked by Joe Gibbs to record an album for him, and one of the tracks recorded as a result, "Money in my Pocket", was a hit with UK reggae audiences and quickly became a favourite of his live performances. This original version of "Money in my Pocket" was in fact produced by Winston "Niney" Holness on behalf of Gibbs, with musical backing from the Soul Syndicate.[12] In the same year, Brown performed as part of a Christmas morning showcase in Toronto, Canada, along with Delroy Wilson, Scotty, Errol Dunkley, and the Fabulous Flames, where he was billed as the "Boy Wonder of Jamaica" and was considered the star of the show in a local newspaper review.[12] The song's popularity in the UK was further cemented with the release a deejay version, "A-So We Stay (Money in Hand)", credited to Big Youth and Dennis Brown, which outsold the original single and topped the Jamaican singles chart.[12] Brown and Holness became close, even sharing a house in Pembroke Hall.[8] Brown followed this with another collaboration with Holness on "Westbound Train", which was the biggest Jamaican hit of summer 1973,[13] and Brown's star status was confirmed when he was voted Jamaica's top male vocalist in a poll by Swing magazine the same year.[13] Brown followed this success with "Cassandra" and "No More Will I Roam", and tracks such as "Africa" and "Love Jah", displaying Brown's Rastafari beliefs, became staples on London's sound system scene.[13] In 1973, Brown was hospitalized due to fatigue caused by overwork, although at the time rumours spread that he only had one lung and had only a week to live, or had contracted tuberculosis.[13] He was advised to take an extended break from performing and concentrated instead on his college studies.[13]

Brown returned to music and toured the United Kingdom for the first time in late summer 1974 as part of a Jamaican showcase, along with Cynthia Richards, Al Brown, Sharon Forrester, and The Maytals, after which he was invited to stay on for further dates (where he was backed by The Cimarons, staying in the UK for another three months.[14] While in the UK, he recorded for the first time since his hospitalization, working with producer Sydney Crooks, and again backed by the Cimarons.[14] While Brown was in the UK, Gibbs released an album collecting recordings made earlier in Jamaica, released as The Best of Dennis Brown, and Brown's first single to get a proper UK release was issued on the Synda label - "No More Will I Roam".[15] He returned to Jamaica for Christmas, but six weeks later was back in the UK, now with Holness in tow as his business manager, to negotiate a record deal with Trojan Records, the first Brown album to be released as a result being Just Dennis, although the pair would be left out of pocket after Trojan's collapse and subsequent buyout by Saga Records.[16] On their return to Jamaica, Brown and Holness resumed recording in earnest with tracks for a new album, including "So Long Rastafari", "Boasting", and "Open the Gate".[17] During 1975, Brown also recorded one-off sessions for Sonia Pottinger ("If You leave Me") and Bunny Lee ("So Much Pain", a duet with Johnny Clarke), and the first recordings began to appear on Brown's new DEB Music label.[18] In the wake of the Trojan collapse, Brown and Holness arranged a deal with local independent label owners Castro Brown (who ran Morpheus Records) and Larry Lawrence (Ethnic Fight) to distribute their releases in the UK.[19] Brown saw the UK as the most important market to target and performed for five consecutive nights at the Georgian Club in Croydon to raise funds to start his new DEB Music label with Castro Brown.[20] In early 1976, Castro secured a deal with Radio London disc jockey Charlie Gillett for Morpheus (and hence DEB) output to be issued through the latter's Oval Records, which had a distribution deal with Virgin Records, but after a dispute over Castro's separate supply of these records to London record shops, the deal was scrapped and the early DEB releases suffered from a lack of promotion.[21] Later that year, Brown voiced two tracks at Lee "Scratch" Perry's Black Ark studio, "Take a Trip to Zion" and "Wolf and Leopard", the latter of which was a hit in Jamaica and would prove to be one of Brown's most popular songs, with a lyric criticizing those criminals who "rode the natty dread bandwagon".[22] Brown confirmed in an interview in Black Echoes that he had parted company with Holness, stating: "I was going along with one man's ideas for too long. Niney was trying to find a new beat at all times, which was disconcerting, so I hadn't been working with my true abilities. Now I know that I can produce myself.In the late 1990s, Brown's health began to deteriorate. He had developed respiratory issues, probably exacerbated by longstanding problems with drug addiction, namely cocaine,[43] leading to him being taken ill in May 1999 after touring in Brazil with other reggae singers, where he was diagnosed with pneumonia.[41] After returning to Kingston, Jamaica, on the evening of 30 June 1999, he was rushed to Kingston's University Hospital, suffering from cardiac arrest.[44] Brown died the next day, the official cause of his death was a collapsed lung.[38][44][45][46][47] Sitting Jamaican Prime Minister P. J. Patterson and former prime minister, serving at the time as opposition leader, Edward Seaga of the Jamaica Labour Party both spoke at Brown's funeral, which was held on 17 July 1999 in Kingston. The service, which lasted for three hours, also featured live performances by Maxi Priest, Shaggy, and three of Brown's sons. Brown was then buried at Kingston's National Heroes Park.[48] Brown was survived by his wife Yvonne and ten children.[3] Prime Minister Patterson paid tribute to Brown, saying: "Over the years, Dennis Brown has distinguished himself as one of the finest and most talented musicians of our time. The Crown Prince of Reggae as he was commonly called. He has left us with a vast repertoire of songs which will continue to satisfy the hearts and minds of us all for generations to come."

24 Nov
Published in Song of 2day

Crowded House are a rock band formed in Melbourne, Australia, in 1985. The founding members were New Zealander Neil Finn (vocalist, guitarist, primary songwriter) and Australians Paul Hester (drums) and Nick Seymour (bass). Later band members included Neil Finn's brother, Tim Finn, and Americans Mark Hart and Matt Sherrod.[1][1][2]

Originally active from 1985 to 1996, the band has had consistent commercial and critical success in Australia and New Zealand[3][4][5] and international chart success in two phases, beginning with their self-titled debut album, which reached number twelve on the US Album Chart in 1987 and provided the Top Ten hits "Don't Dream It's Over" and "Something So Strong".[6][7] Further international success came in the UK and Europe with their third and fourth albums, Woodface and Together Alone and the compilation album Recurring Dream, which included the hits "Fall at Your Feet", "Weather with You", "Distant Sun", "Locked Out", "Instinct" and "Not the Girl You Think You Are".[8][9] Queen Elizabeth II bestowed an OBE on both Neil and Tim Finn, in June 1993, for their contribution to the music of New Zealand.[10]

Founding drummer Hester left in May 1994 citing family reasons, but briefly returned for their "Farewell to the World" concerts in Melbourne and Sydney in 1996.[1] Neil Finn had decided to end the band to concentrate on his solo career and the Finn Brothers project with Tim.[1] On 26 March 2005 Hester committed suicide, aged 46.[11]

In 2006 the group re-formed with new drummer Matt Sherrod and have since released two further albums, both of which reached number one on Australia's album chart.

Thanks to their Split Enz connection, the newly formed Crowded House had an established Australasian fanbase.[1] They began by playing at festivals in Australia and New Zealand and released their debut album, Crowded House, in June 1986.[1] Capitol Records initially failed to see the band's potential and gave them only low key promotion,[8] forcing the band to play at small venues to try and gain attention. The album's first single, "Mean to Me", reached the Australian Kent Music Report Singles Chart top 30 in June.[3] It failed to chart in the US,[6] but moderate American airplay introduced US listeners to the group.

A single, "Don't Dream It's Over", was released in December 1986 and proved an international hit, reaching number two on the US Billboard Hot 100[6] and number one in Canada.[13] New Zealand radio stations initially gave the song little support until months later when it became successful internationally[citation needed] . Ultimately the song reached number one on the New Zealand singles chart and number eight in Australia.[3][5] It remains the group's most commercially successful song.

"Don't Dream It's Over" is a song by the Australian rock band Crowded House, recorded for their 1986 self-titled debut studio album.[1] The song was written by band member Neil Finn, and released in October 1986 as the fourth single from the album.

"Don't Dream It's Over", described by AllMusic as a "majestic ballad",[2] became the band's biggest international hit, reaching No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States in April 1987.[3] "Don't Dream It's Over" was also a great success in Neil Finn's native country New Zealand where it peaked at No. 1, it also topped the charts in Canada, while in Australia it peaked at No. 8. In Continental Europe, it reached No. 6 in Norway, No. 7 in the Netherlands, and No. 13 in Germany. In America the single was topped only by "I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)" by Aretha Franklin and George Michael.

In May 2001, the Australasian Performing Rights Association (APRA) celebrated its 75th anniversary by naming the Best New Zealand and Best Australian songs of all time, as decided by APRA members and an industry panel. "Don't Dream It's Over" was ranked second on the New Zealand list[4] and seventh on the Australian list.

24 Nov
Published in Song of 2day

Crowded House are a rock band formed in Melbourne, Australia, in 1985. The founding members were New Zealander Neil Finn (vocalist, guitarist, primary songwriter) and Australians Paul Hester (drums) and Nick Seymour (bass). Later band members included Neil Finn's brother, Tim Finn, and Americans Mark Hart and Matt Sherrod.[1][1][2]

Originally active from 1985 to 1996, the band has had consistent commercial and critical success in Australia and New Zealand[3][4][5] and international chart success in two phases, beginning with their self-titled debut album, which reached number twelve on the US Album Chart in 1987 and provided the Top Ten hits "Don't Dream It's Over" and "Something So Strong".[6][7] Further international success came in the UK and Europe with their third and fourth albums, Woodface and Together Alone and the compilation album Recurring Dream, which included the hits "Fall at Your Feet", "Weather with You", "Distant Sun", "Locked Out", "Instinct" and "Not the Girl You Think You Are".[8][9] Queen Elizabeth II bestowed an OBE on both Neil and Tim Finn, in June 1993, for their contribution to the music of New Zealand.[10]

Founding drummer Hester left in May 1994 citing family reasons, but briefly returned for their "Farewell to the World" concerts in Melbourne and Sydney in 1996.[1] Neil Finn had decided to end the band to concentrate on his solo career and the Finn Brothers project with Tim.[1] On 26 March 2005 Hester committed suicide, aged 46.[11]

In 2006 the group re-formed with new drummer Matt Sherrod and have since released two further albums, both of which reached number one on Australia's album chart.

Thanks to their Split Enz connection, the newly formed Crowded House had an established Australasian fanbase.[1] They began by playing at festivals in Australia and New Zealand and released their debut album, Crowded House, in June 1986.[1] Capitol Records initially failed to see the band's potential and gave them only low key promotion,[8] forcing the band to play at small venues to try and gain attention. The album's first single, "Mean to Me", reached the Australian Kent Music Report Singles Chart top 30 in June.[3] It failed to chart in the US,[6] but moderate American airplay introduced US listeners to the group.

A single, "Don't Dream It's Over", was released in December 1986 and proved an international hit, reaching number two on the US Billboard Hot 100[6] and number one in Canada.[13] New Zealand radio stations initially gave the song little support until months later when it became successful internationally[citation needed] . Ultimately the song reached number one on the New Zealand singles chart and number eight in Australia.[3][5] It remains the group's most commercially successful song.

"Don't Dream It's Over" is a song by the Australian rock band Crowded House, recorded for their 1986 self-titled debut studio album.[1] The song was written by band member Neil Finn, and released in October 1986 as the fourth single from the album.

"Don't Dream It's Over", described by AllMusic as a "majestic ballad",[2] became the band's biggest international hit, reaching No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States in April 1987.[3] "Don't Dream It's Over" was also a great success in Neil Finn's native country New Zealand where it peaked at No. 1, it also topped the charts in Canada, while in Australia it peaked at No. 8. In Continental Europe, it reached No. 6 in Norway, No. 7 in the Netherlands, and No. 13 in Germany. In America the single was topped only by "I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)" by Aretha Franklin and George Michael.

In May 2001, the Australasian Performing Rights Association (APRA) celebrated its 75th anniversary by naming the Best New Zealand and Best Australian songs of all time, as decided by APRA members and an industry panel. "Don't Dream It's Over" was ranked second on the New Zealand list[4] and seventh on the Australian list.

18 Nov
Published in Song of 2day

Bob Marley and the Wailers were a Jamaican reggae band and, earlier, a ska vocalist group created by Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer. The ska vocalist group Wailers, which 8 years later should be a band,[clarification needed] were formed when self-taught musician Hubert Winston McIntosh (Peter Tosh) met the singers Neville Livingston (Bunny Wailer), and Robert Nesta Marley (Bob Marley) in 1963. By late 1963 singers Junior Braithwaite, Beverley Kelso, and Cherry Smith had joined the Wailers, who was comped by music studio bands. In early 70s Bob and Bunny had learned to play some instruments and brothers Carlton Barrett and Aston "Family Man" Barrett on drums and bass had joined the reggae band. After Bunny Wailer and Peter Tosh left the band in 1974, Bob Marley began touring with new band members. His new backing band included Barrett brothers, Junior Marvin and Al Anderson on lead guitar, Tyrone Downie and Earl "Wya" Lindo on keyboards, and Alvin "Seeco" Patterson on percussion. The "I Threes", consisting of Judy Mowatt, Marcia Griffiths, and Marley's wife, Rita, provided backing vocals.

The lineup was known variously as the Teenagers, the Wailing Rudeboys, the Wailing Wailers and finally the Wailers. The original lineup featured Junior Braithwaite on vocals, Bob Marley on guitar, Peter Tosh on keyboard, Neville Livingston (a.k.a. Bunny Wailer) on drums, and Cherry Smith and Beverley Kelso on backing vocals. By 1966 Braithwaite, Kelso and Smith had left the band, which then consisted of the trio Livingston, Marley and Tosh.

Some of the Wailers' most notable songs were recorded with Lee "Scratch" Perry and his studio band the Upsetters. In 1964, the Wailers topped the Jamaican charts with Simmer Down. During the early 1970s the Upsetters members Aston "Family Man" Barrett and his brother Carlton (Carlie) Barrett,[1] formed the Wailers Band, providing instrumental backing for The Wailers. The Wailers recorded groundbreaking ska and reggae songs such as "Simmer Down", "Trenchtown Rock", "Nice Time", "War", "Stir It Up" and "Get Up, Stand Up". An attempt at creating a full overview of all the music made by The Wailers prior to their signing to Island Records was made by the Roots Reggae Library.

The original Wailers line-up disbanded in 1974 due to Tosh and Livingston's refusal to tour. Bob Marley formed Bob Marley and the Wailers with himself as guitarist, songwriter and main singer, the Wailers Band as the backing band, and the I Threes as backup vocalists. The Wailers Band included the brothers Carlton Barrett and "Family Man" Barrett on drums and bass respectively, Junior Marvin and Al Anderson playing lead guitar, Tyrone Downie and Earl "Wya" Lindo playing keyboard, and Alvin "Seeco" Patterson playing percussion. The I Threes consisted of Bob Marley's wife Rita Marley, Judy Mowatt and Marcia Griffiths.

Livingston believed that producer Chris Blackwell, whom he called "Chris Whiteworst", was responsible for the bad relationship between the band members, as he thought Blackwell released their albums under "Bob Marley and the Wailers" instead of "the Wailers" since 1969, which tested their friendship. Perry released two compilation albums for Trojan Records in 1974, Rasta Revolution and African Herbsman, which contained songs from Soul Rebels and Soul Revolution, respectively, and he was the copyright holder of several songs from these albums.[3] These changes caused a major dispute between Marley and Perry, when the former saw the albums, six months after their publication, in the Half Way Road in England.

18 Nov
Published in Song of 2day

Bob Marley and the Wailers were a Jamaican reggae band and, earlier, a ska vocalist group created by Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer. The ska vocalist group Wailers, which 8 years later should be a band,[clarification needed] were formed when self-taught musician Hubert Winston McIntosh (Peter Tosh) met the singers Neville Livingston (Bunny Wailer), and Robert Nesta Marley (Bob Marley) in 1963. By late 1963 singers Junior Braithwaite, Beverley Kelso, and Cherry Smith had joined the Wailers, who was comped by music studio bands. In early 70s Bob and Bunny had learned to play some instruments and brothers Carlton Barrett and Aston "Family Man" Barrett on drums and bass had joined the reggae band. After Bunny Wailer and Peter Tosh left the band in 1974, Bob Marley began touring with new band members. His new backing band included Barrett brothers, Junior Marvin and Al Anderson on lead guitar, Tyrone Downie and Earl "Wya" Lindo on keyboards, and Alvin "Seeco" Patterson on percussion. The "I Threes", consisting of Judy Mowatt, Marcia Griffiths, and Marley's wife, Rita, provided backing vocals.

The lineup was known variously as the Teenagers, the Wailing Rudeboys, the Wailing Wailers and finally the Wailers. The original lineup featured Junior Braithwaite on vocals, Bob Marley on guitar, Peter Tosh on keyboard, Neville Livingston (a.k.a. Bunny Wailer) on drums, and Cherry Smith and Beverley Kelso on backing vocals. By 1966 Braithwaite, Kelso and Smith had left the band, which then consisted of the trio Livingston, Marley and Tosh.

Some of the Wailers' most notable songs were recorded with Lee "Scratch" Perry and his studio band the Upsetters. In 1964, the Wailers topped the Jamaican charts with Simmer Down. During the early 1970s the Upsetters members Aston "Family Man" Barrett and his brother Carlton (Carlie) Barrett,[1] formed the Wailers Band, providing instrumental backing for The Wailers. The Wailers recorded groundbreaking ska and reggae songs such as "Simmer Down", "Trenchtown Rock", "Nice Time", "War", "Stir It Up" and "Get Up, Stand Up". An attempt at creating a full overview of all the music made by The Wailers prior to their signing to Island Records was made by the Roots Reggae Library.

The original Wailers line-up disbanded in 1974 due to Tosh and Livingston's refusal to tour. Bob Marley formed Bob Marley and the Wailers with himself as guitarist, songwriter and main singer, the Wailers Band as the backing band, and the I Threes as backup vocalists. The Wailers Band included the brothers Carlton Barrett and "Family Man" Barrett on drums and bass respectively, Junior Marvin and Al Anderson playing lead guitar, Tyrone Downie and Earl "Wya" Lindo playing keyboard, and Alvin "Seeco" Patterson playing percussion. The I Threes consisted of Bob Marley's wife Rita Marley, Judy Mowatt and Marcia Griffiths.

Livingston believed that producer Chris Blackwell, whom he called "Chris Whiteworst", was responsible for the bad relationship between the band members, as he thought Blackwell released their albums under "Bob Marley and the Wailers" instead of "the Wailers" since 1969, which tested their friendship. Perry released two compilation albums for Trojan Records in 1974, Rasta Revolution and African Herbsman, which contained songs from Soul Rebels and Soul Revolution, respectively, and he was the copyright holder of several songs from these albums.[3] These changes caused a major dispute between Marley and Perry, when the former saw the albums, six months after their publication, in the Half Way Road in England.

17 Nov
Published in Song of 2day

The B-52s (styled as The B-52's prior to 2008)[1] are an American new wave band, formed in Athens, Georgia in 1976. The original line-up consisted of Fred Schneider (vocals, percussion, keyboards), Kate Pierson (organ, keyboards, bass, vocals), Cindy Wilson (vocals, bongos, tambourine), Ricky Wilson (guitars, bass), and Keith Strickland (drums, guitars, keyboards, synthesizers, various instruments). Following Ricky Wilson's death in 1985, Strickland switched full-time to guitar. The band subsequently added various musicians for their live shows. This included Sara Lee or Tracy Wormworth (bass), Zachary Alford or Sterling Campbell (drums, percussion) and Pat Irwin or Paul Gordon (keyboards & guitars).

Rooted in new wave and 1960s rock and roll, the group later covered many genres ranging from post-punk to pop rock. The "guy vs. gals" vocals of Schneider, Pierson, and Wilson, sometimes used in call and response style ("Strobe Light," "Private Idaho", and "Good Stuff"), are a trademark. The group is also notable for almost all of its members being openly gay[2][3][4] (Cindy Wilson is the lone exception).

The B-52's were formed in 1976 when vocalist Cindy Wilson, her older brother and guitarist Ricky, organist and vocalist Kate Pierson, original drummer and percussionist Keith Strickland and cowbell player, poet and vocalist Fred Schneider played an impromptu musical jam session after sharing a tropical Flaming Volcano drink at a Chinese restaurant in Athens, Georgia. Other ideas they had to name their band were the "Tina-Trons" and "Felini's Children". When they first jammed, Strickland played guitar and Wilson played congas. They later played their first concert (with Wilson playing guitar) in 1977 at a Valentine's Day party for their friends.[5][6][7]

The band's name comes from a particular beehive hairdo resembling the nose cone of the aircraft of the same name[citation needed]. Keith Strickland suggested the name after a dream he had had one night, of a band performing in a hotel lounge. In the dream he heard someone whisper in his ear that the name of the band was "the B-52s." The band's quirky take on the new wave sound of their era was a combination of dance and surf music set apart from their contemporaries by the unusual guitar tunings used by Ricky Wilson[7] and thrift-store chic.

Their first single, "Rock Lobster", recorded for DB Records in 1978, was an underground success,[5] selling over 2,000 copies in total[7] that led to the B-52's performing at CBGB and Max's Kansas City[7] in New York City. Both this version of "Rock Lobster" and its B-side "52 Girls" are different recordings from those on their first album, and the early version of "52 Girls" is in a different key.

The re-recorded version of "Rock Lobster" was released as a single. In the UK and Germany it was backed with an instrumental version of "Running Around", a non-album track, of which a vocal re-recording would appear on their second album, Wild Planet. The buzz created by the record in the UK meant their first show in London at the Electric Ballroom, London, was packed in anticipation, with many UK pop stars such as Sandie Shaw, Green Gartside from Scritti Politti, Joe Jackson, and others in attendance. In Canada, released on the Warner Bros. label, the single went from cult hit to bona fide smash, eventually going on to reach the No. 1 position in the RPM-compiled national chart on May 24, 1980.[8]

In 1979, the B-52's signed contracts with Warner Bros. Records for North America, South America, Australia, and New Zealand; and with Island Records for the UK, Europe, and Asia. Chris Blackwell, founder of Island, produced their debut studio album.[7] Recorded at Blackwell's Compass Point Studios in The Bahamas, and released on July 6, 1979, The B-52's contained re-recorded versions of "Rock Lobster" and "52 Girls", six originals recorded solely for the album, and a remake of the Petula Clark single "Downtown". According to the band interview on the DVD With the Wild Crowd! Live in Athens, GA, the band was surprised by Blackwell's recording methods; he wanted to keep the sound as close as possible to their actual live sound so used almost no overdubs or additional effects. The album was a major success for the band, especially in Australia where it reached number three on the charts alongside its three singles "Planet Claire", "Rock Lobster", and "Dance This Mess Around". In the United States, the single "Rock Lobster" reached the Billboard Hot 100 chart, while the album itself was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.

The follow-up, Wild Planet, reached number eighteen on the Billboard 200 chart in 1980[9] and was certified gold. "Private Idaho" became their second Hot 100 entry. On January 26, 1980, The B-52's performed on Saturday Night Live. They also performed at the Heatwave festival (billed as the "New Wave Woodstock") in Toronto, Canada in August 1980; and appeared in the Paul Simon film One Trick Pony.

Their third release was a remix of tracks from their first two studio albums. Party Mix! took six tracks from the first two LPs and presented them in extended forms.

John Lennon cited "Rock Lobster" as an inspiration for his comeback.

"Give Me Back My Man" is a song written and recorded by the American rock band The B-52's. It was released as the second single from their 1980 album Wild Planet and is one of many solo vocal performances from Cindy Wilson in the band's earlier years.

17 Nov
Published in Song of 2day

The B-52s (styled as The B-52's prior to 2008)[1] are an American new wave band, formed in Athens, Georgia in 1976. The original line-up consisted of Fred Schneider (vocals, percussion, keyboards), Kate Pierson (organ, keyboards, bass, vocals), Cindy Wilson (vocals, bongos, tambourine), Ricky Wilson (guitars, bass), and Keith Strickland (drums, guitars, keyboards, synthesizers, various instruments). Following Ricky Wilson's death in 1985, Strickland switched full-time to guitar. The band subsequently added various musicians for their live shows. This included Sara Lee or Tracy Wormworth (bass), Zachary Alford or Sterling Campbell (drums, percussion) and Pat Irwin or Paul Gordon (keyboards & guitars).

Rooted in new wave and 1960s rock and roll, the group later covered many genres ranging from post-punk to pop rock. The "guy vs. gals" vocals of Schneider, Pierson, and Wilson, sometimes used in call and response style ("Strobe Light," "Private Idaho", and "Good Stuff"), are a trademark. The group is also notable for almost all of its members being openly gay[2][3][4] (Cindy Wilson is the lone exception).

The B-52's were formed in 1976 when vocalist Cindy Wilson, her older brother and guitarist Ricky, organist and vocalist Kate Pierson, original drummer and percussionist Keith Strickland and cowbell player, poet and vocalist Fred Schneider played an impromptu musical jam session after sharing a tropical Flaming Volcano drink at a Chinese restaurant in Athens, Georgia. Other ideas they had to name their band were the "Tina-Trons" and "Felini's Children". When they first jammed, Strickland played guitar and Wilson played congas. They later played their first concert (with Wilson playing guitar) in 1977 at a Valentine's Day party for their friends.[5][6][7]

The band's name comes from a particular beehive hairdo resembling the nose cone of the aircraft of the same name[citation needed]. Keith Strickland suggested the name after a dream he had had one night, of a band performing in a hotel lounge. In the dream he heard someone whisper in his ear that the name of the band was "the B-52s." The band's quirky take on the new wave sound of their era was a combination of dance and surf music set apart from their contemporaries by the unusual guitar tunings used by Ricky Wilson[7] and thrift-store chic.

Their first single, "Rock Lobster", recorded for DB Records in 1978, was an underground success,[5] selling over 2,000 copies in total[7] that led to the B-52's performing at CBGB and Max's Kansas City[7] in New York City. Both this version of "Rock Lobster" and its B-side "52 Girls" are different recordings from those on their first album, and the early version of "52 Girls" is in a different key.

The re-recorded version of "Rock Lobster" was released as a single. In the UK and Germany it was backed with an instrumental version of "Running Around", a non-album track, of which a vocal re-recording would appear on their second album, Wild Planet. The buzz created by the record in the UK meant their first show in London at the Electric Ballroom, London, was packed in anticipation, with many UK pop stars such as Sandie Shaw, Green Gartside from Scritti Politti, Joe Jackson, and others in attendance. In Canada, released on the Warner Bros. label, the single went from cult hit to bona fide smash, eventually going on to reach the No. 1 position in the RPM-compiled national chart on May 24, 1980.[8]

In 1979, the B-52's signed contracts with Warner Bros. Records for North America, South America, Australia, and New Zealand; and with Island Records for the UK, Europe, and Asia. Chris Blackwell, founder of Island, produced their debut studio album.[7] Recorded at Blackwell's Compass Point Studios in The Bahamas, and released on July 6, 1979, The B-52's contained re-recorded versions of "Rock Lobster" and "52 Girls", six originals recorded solely for the album, and a remake of the Petula Clark single "Downtown". According to the band interview on the DVD With the Wild Crowd! Live in Athens, GA, the band was surprised by Blackwell's recording methods; he wanted to keep the sound as close as possible to their actual live sound so used almost no overdubs or additional effects. The album was a major success for the band, especially in Australia where it reached number three on the charts alongside its three singles "Planet Claire", "Rock Lobster", and "Dance This Mess Around". In the United States, the single "Rock Lobster" reached the Billboard Hot 100 chart, while the album itself was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.

The follow-up, Wild Planet, reached number eighteen on the Billboard 200 chart in 1980[9] and was certified gold. "Private Idaho" became their second Hot 100 entry. On January 26, 1980, The B-52's performed on Saturday Night Live. They also performed at the Heatwave festival (billed as the "New Wave Woodstock") in Toronto, Canada in August 1980; and appeared in the Paul Simon film One Trick Pony.

Their third release was a remix of tracks from their first two studio albums. Party Mix! took six tracks from the first two LPs and presented them in extended forms.

John Lennon cited "Rock Lobster" as an inspiration for his comeback.

"Give Me Back My Man" is a song written and recorded by the American rock band The B-52's. It was released as the second single from their 1980 album Wild Planet and is one of many solo vocal performances from Cindy Wilson in the band's earlier years.

17 Nov
Published in Song of 2day

The B-52s (styled as The B-52's prior to 2008)[1] are an American new wave band, formed in Athens, Georgia in 1976. The original line-up consisted of Fred Schneider (vocals, percussion, keyboards), Kate Pierson (organ, keyboards, bass, vocals), Cindy Wilson (vocals, bongos, tambourine), Ricky Wilson (guitars, bass), and Keith Strickland (drums, guitars, keyboards, synthesizers, various instruments). Following Ricky Wilson's death in 1985, Strickland switched full-time to guitar. The band subsequently added various musicians for their live shows. This included Sara Lee or Tracy Wormworth (bass), Zachary Alford or Sterling Campbell (drums, percussion) and Pat Irwin or Paul Gordon (keyboards & guitars).

Rooted in new wave and 1960s rock and roll, the group later covered many genres ranging from post-punk to pop rock. The "guy vs. gals" vocals of Schneider, Pierson, and Wilson, sometimes used in call and response style ("Strobe Light," "Private Idaho", and "Good Stuff"), are a trademark. The group is also notable for almost all of its members being openly gay[2][3][4] (Cindy Wilson is the lone exception).

The B-52's were formed in 1976 when vocalist Cindy Wilson, her older brother and guitarist Ricky, organist and vocalist Kate Pierson, original drummer and percussionist Keith Strickland and cowbell player, poet and vocalist Fred Schneider played an impromptu musical jam session after sharing a tropical Flaming Volcano drink at a Chinese restaurant in Athens, Georgia. Other ideas they had to name their band were the "Tina-Trons" and "Felini's Children". When they first jammed, Strickland played guitar and Wilson played congas. They later played their first concert (with Wilson playing guitar) in 1977 at a Valentine's Day party for their friends.[5][6][7]

The band's name comes from a particular beehive hairdo resembling the nose cone of the aircraft of the same name[citation needed]. Keith Strickland suggested the name after a dream he had had one night, of a band performing in a hotel lounge. In the dream he heard someone whisper in his ear that the name of the band was "the B-52s." The band's quirky take on the new wave sound of their era was a combination of dance and surf music set apart from their contemporaries by the unusual guitar tunings used by Ricky Wilson[7] and thrift-store chic.

Their first single, "Rock Lobster", recorded for DB Records in 1978, was an underground success,[5] selling over 2,000 copies in total[7] that led to the B-52's performing at CBGB and Max's Kansas City[7] in New York City. Both this version of "Rock Lobster" and its B-side "52 Girls" are different recordings from those on their first album, and the early version of "52 Girls" is in a different key.

The re-recorded version of "Rock Lobster" was released as a single. In the UK and Germany it was backed with an instrumental version of "Running Around", a non-album track, of which a vocal re-recording would appear on their second album, Wild Planet. The buzz created by the record in the UK meant their first show in London at the Electric Ballroom, London, was packed in anticipation, with many UK pop stars such as Sandie Shaw, Green Gartside from Scritti Politti, Joe Jackson, and others in attendance. In Canada, released on the Warner Bros. label, the single went from cult hit to bona fide smash, eventually going on to reach the No. 1 position in the RPM-compiled national chart on May 24, 1980.[8]

In 1979, the B-52's signed contracts with Warner Bros. Records for North America, South America, Australia, and New Zealand; and with Island Records for the UK, Europe, and Asia. Chris Blackwell, founder of Island, produced their debut studio album.[7] Recorded at Blackwell's Compass Point Studios in The Bahamas, and released on July 6, 1979, The B-52's contained re-recorded versions of "Rock Lobster" and "52 Girls", six originals recorded solely for the album, and a remake of the Petula Clark single "Downtown". According to the band interview on the DVD With the Wild Crowd! Live in Athens, GA, the band was surprised by Blackwell's recording methods; he wanted to keep the sound as close as possible to their actual live sound so used almost no overdubs or additional effects. The album was a major success for the band, especially in Australia where it reached number three on the charts alongside its three singles "Planet Claire", "Rock Lobster", and "Dance This Mess Around". In the United States, the single "Rock Lobster" reached the Billboard Hot 100 chart, while the album itself was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.

The follow-up, Wild Planet, reached number eighteen on the Billboard 200 chart in 1980[9] and was certified gold. "Private Idaho" became their second Hot 100 entry. On January 26, 1980, The B-52's performed on Saturday Night Live. They also performed at the Heatwave festival (billed as the "New Wave Woodstock") in Toronto, Canada in August 1980; and appeared in the Paul Simon film One Trick Pony.

Their third release was a remix of tracks from their first two studio albums. Party Mix! took six tracks from the first two LPs and presented them in extended forms.

John Lennon cited "Rock Lobster" as an inspiration for his comeback.

"Give Me Back My Man" is a song written and recorded by the American rock band The B-52's. It was released as the second single from their 1980 album Wild Planet and is one of many solo vocal performances from Cindy Wilson in the band's earlier years.

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