Items filtered by date: September 2015
27 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

DA! were a Chicago-based post-punk band of the early 1980s.

DA! was formed by 17-year-old singer/bassist Lorna Donley in 1977, along with guitarist/keyboardist Evelyn Marquis and drummer Dawn Fisher. This lineup performed only once, and guitarist Gaylene Goudreau (who had previously played with all-girl punk band Lois Layne) was added in late 1979.

By early 1980 DA! had parted ways with Marquis and replaced her with guitarist David Thomas (who had previously played in St. Louis punk bands The Singapores and Cool Jerk). By that summer, they had become a fixture on Chicago's early punk music scene, performing regularly at area clubs like O'Banion's, Tuts, Waves, Exit, Oz and Space Place and opening for visiting groups including The Fall, DNA, Bauhaus and Mission of Burma.

DA!'s manager, Terry Nelson,a local punk radio DJ, formed Autumn Records with producer George Kapoulas. DA! began to record demos in the late summer of 1980 with Timothy Powell and Metro Mobile. Their first single, "Dark Rooms"/"White Castles",[1] was produced at Acme Studios by Kapoulas and Mike Rasfeld. With the spring 1981 release of the single, DA! garnered attention outside of Chicago, and performed in Milwaukee with The Ama-Dots, in Minneapolis with Hüsker Dü, and in Madison with X. Kapoulas, an engineer at WGN-TV, produced a music video for the single and "Dark Rooms" went into heavy rotation on "Rock America", a pre-MTV video cable service available in music clubs.

DA! was featured on the next Autumn Records release, a 1981 compilation LP titled Busted at Oz.[2][3] Recorded over three nights, it featured live recordings by DA! and other seminal Chicago punk bands including Strike Under, Naked Raygun, Silver Abuse, The Subverts, and The Effigies.

Following the release of the Busted at Oz LP, Fisher was briefly replaced by Strike Under drummer Bob Furem. DA! recorded the Time Will Be Kind[4] EP with Powell at Sound Impressions in late 1981, but by the time of its 1982 release, the group had disbanded.

DA! and Lorna Donley were featured in You Weren’t There a/k/a You Weren’t There: A History of Chicago Punk, 1977-1984,[5] a 2007 film about the Chicago punk scene from 1977-1984. In 2010, Factory 25 Records released Exclamation Point,[6] a vinyl LP compiling the band's previously released and unreleased material. DA! played two Chicago shows in 2010 to support the LP, the first show with Furem on drums, the second with new drummer Jason Batchko.

Donley, later a librarian in the Chicago Public Library system, died on December 1, 2013.[7]

Music historian Joel Whitburn once speculated the band had recorded "Ready 'n' Steady," a lost song, credited to D.A., that appeared on the Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles for three weeks in 1979. The band insisted that they had not recorded the record.[8]

24 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

Stanley Robert "Bobby" Vinton, Jr. (born April 16, 1935) is an American pop music singer of Polish and Lithuanian ethnic background. In pop music circles, he became known as "The Polish Prince of Poch", as his music plays tribute to his Polish heritage. Known for his angelic vocals in love songs, his most popular song, "Blue Velvet" (a cover of Tony Bennett's 1951 song), peaked at No. 1 on the now renamed Billboard Pop Singles Chart. It also served as inspiration for the film of the same name.

In 1964, Vinton had two #1 hits, "There! I've Said It Again" (a #1 hit in 1945 for Vaughn Monroe) and "Mr. Lonely". Vinton's version of "There! I've Said It Again" is noteworthy for being the final U.S. Billboard number one single of the pre-Beatles era, deposed from the Hot 100's summit by "I Want to Hold Your Hand". Also noteworthy is the fact that Vinton continued to have big hit records during the British Invasion, scoring 16 top ten hits, while Connie Francis, Ricky Nelson, the Shirelles and other major artists of the early 1960s struggled to reach even the Top 30.

Vinton wrote "Mr. Lonely" during his chaplain's assistant service in the U.S. Army in the late 1950s. The song was recorded during the same 1962 session that produced "Roses Are Red" and launched Vinton's singing career. It was released as an album track on the 1962 Roses Are Red (and other songs for the young & sentimental) LP. Despite pressure from Vinton to release it as a single, Epic instead had Buddy Greco release it and it flopped. Two years and millions of records sold later, Bobby prevailed on Epic to include "Mr. Lonely" on his Bobby Vinton's Greatest Hits LP. Soon DJ's picked up on the song and airplay resulted in demand for a single release. "Mr. Lonely" shot up the charts in the late fall of 1964 and reached #1 on the charts on 12 December 1964. Epic then released the LP Bobby Vinton Mr. Lonely, giving the song a unique claim to fame since it now appeared on three Bobby Vinton albums released within two years. The song has continued to spin gold for its composer in the 45 years since it hit #1. Harmony Korine named his 2007 film Mister Lonely after the latter, and it is now also the basis for Akon's hit, "Lonely

Lemon Popsicle (Israeli: Eskimo Limon, Hebrew: אסקימו לימון‎) is a 1978 Israeli cult film directed by Boaz Davidson which led to a series of sequels.[1] The movie follows a group of three teenagers in their quest to lose their virginity.

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23 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

The Lounge Lizards are a jazz group formed in 1978 by saxophonist John Lurie and his brother, pianist Evan Lurie. In American slang, a "lounge lizard" is typically depicted as a well-dressed man who frequents the establishments in which the rich gather with the intention of seducing a wealthy woman with his flattery and deceptive charm.[1]

Drawing on punk rock and no wave as much as jazz, The Lounge Lizards have since become respected for their creative and distinctive sound.[neutrality is disputed] In October of 1986, Robert Palmer of The New York Times wrote "the Lounge Lizards...have staked their claim to a musical territory that lies somewhere west of Charles Mingus and east of Bernard Hermann and made it their own."

The initial Lounge Lizards line-up consisted of John and Evan Lurie, guitarist Arto Lindsay, bassist Steve Piccolo, and percussionist Anton Fier. They recorded a self-titled album on EG Records records in 1981. The album included two Thelonious Monk covers, but as one critic noted, "the two aforementioned Monk covers seem a strange choice when you actually hear the band, which has more in common with sonic experimentalists like Ornette Coleman or Sun Ra." [2]

By the mid-1980s a new line-up included bassist Erik Sanko, trombonist Curtis Fowlkes, guitarist Marc Ribot, saxophonist Roy Nathanson, and percussionists Dougie Bowne and E.J. Rodriguez. This group recorded various live and studio albums, and showcased John Lurie's increasingly sophisticated and multi-layered compositions. [3]

In 1998 the band released The Queen of All Ears on John Lurie's Strange and Beautiful Music label, and had added Steven Bernstein, Michael Blake, Oren Bloedow, David Tronzo, Calvin Weston, and Billy Martin to its ranks. "The Lizards' music isn't jazz," said Fred Bouchard of JazzTimes, "but it is intelligent and rhythmically and harmonically interesting (it ain't rock either, in other words) and, despite the ultra-hip trappings, it has an almost innocent directness that can transcend stylistic prejudice." [4]

Recent years have found the Lounge Lizards less active. John Lurie has been increasingly occupied with painting,[5] while Evan has worked on The Backyardigans, a children's show that highlights multiple musical genres.

23 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

The Lounge Lizards are a jazz group formed in 1978 by saxophonist John Lurie and his brother, pianist Evan Lurie. In American slang, a "lounge lizard" is typically depicted as a well-dressed man who frequents the establishments in which the rich gather with the intention of seducing a wealthy woman with his flattery and deceptive charm.[1]

Drawing on punk rock and no wave as much as jazz, The Lounge Lizards have since become respected for their creative and distinctive sound.[neutrality is disputed] In October of 1986, Robert Palmer of The New York Times wrote "the Lounge Lizards...have staked their claim to a musical territory that lies somewhere west of Charles Mingus and east of Bernard Hermann and made it their own."

The initial Lounge Lizards line-up consisted of John and Evan Lurie, guitarist Arto Lindsay, bassist Steve Piccolo, and percussionist Anton Fier. They recorded a self-titled album on EG Records records in 1981. The album included two Thelonious Monk covers, but as one critic noted, "the two aforementioned Monk covers seem a strange choice when you actually hear the band, which has more in common with sonic experimentalists like Ornette Coleman or Sun Ra." [2]

By the mid-1980s a new line-up included bassist Erik Sanko, trombonist Curtis Fowlkes, guitarist Marc Ribot, saxophonist Roy Nathanson, and percussionists Dougie Bowne and E.J. Rodriguez. This group recorded various live and studio albums, and showcased John Lurie's increasingly sophisticated and multi-layered compositions. [3]

In 1998 the band released The Queen of All Ears on John Lurie's Strange and Beautiful Music label, and had added Steven Bernstein, Michael Blake, Oren Bloedow, David Tronzo, Calvin Weston, and Billy Martin to its ranks. "The Lizards' music isn't jazz," said Fred Bouchard of JazzTimes, "but it is intelligent and rhythmically and harmonically interesting (it ain't rock either, in other words) and, despite the ultra-hip trappings, it has an almost innocent directness that can transcend stylistic prejudice." [4]

Recent years have found the Lounge Lizards less active. John Lurie has been increasingly occupied with painting,[5] while Evan has worked on The Backyardigans, a children's show that highlights multiple musical genres.

20 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

Ramones were an American punk rock band that formed in the New York City neighborhood of Forest Hills, Queens, in 1974. They are often cited as the first band to define the punk rock sound.[1][2] Despite achieving only limited commercial success, the band was a major influence on the 1970s punk movement in both the United States and United Kingdom.

All of the band members adopted pseudonyms ending with the surname "Ramone", although none of them were related. They performed 2,263 concerts, touring virtually nonstop for 22 years.[2] In 1996, after a tour with the Lollapalooza music festival, the band played a farewell concert and disbanded.[3] By 2014, all four of the band's original members—lead singer Joey Ramone (1951–2001), guitarist Johnny Ramone (1948–2004), bassist Dee Dee Ramone (1951–2002) and drummer Tommy Ramone (1949–2014)—had died.[4][5][6][7]

Recognition of the band's importance built over the years, and they are now mentioned in many assessments of all-time great rock music, such as the Rolling Stone list of the "100 Greatest Artists of All Time"[8] and VH1's "100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock".[9] In 2002, the Ramones were ranked the second-greatest band of all time by Spin magazine, trailing only the Beatles.[10] On March 18, 2002, the original four members and Tommy's replacement on drums, Marky Ramone, were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[2][11] In 2011, the group was awarded a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

"I Just Want to Have Something to Do" is a song credited to the Ramones but was written by Joey Ramone and was released as the opening song of the band's 1978 album Road to Ruin. It was also released on several of the band's compilation albums. It was also used in the film Rock 'n' Roll High School.

Allmusic critic Donald A. Guarisco described "I Just Want to Have Something to Do" as "one of the best expressions of frustrated desire to ever grace the world of pop music."[1] The song is taken at midtempo, slower than the typical Ramones song.[2] The lyrics describe the singer's need to connect with the listener, and themes include ambivalence and anomie.[1][2] Authors Scott Schinder and Andy Schwartz comment on the surprising rhyme of Second Avenue with chicken vindaloo.[2] Ramones biographer Everett True calls this rhyme "evocative."[3] Music professor Robert Pattison suggests that this lyric was too much "fun," as opposed to "joyous," to be respectable enough to be included in a freshman anthology, but he nonetheless considers it a "rock classic."[4]

Guarisco considers the music to effectively evoke the frustration described in the lyrics by using "twisted, ascending note patterns" in the verses to create a "yearning feel."[1] He also states that the music in the refrain enhances the yearning effect with its "sense of swing."[1] True states that the song evokes a sense of "pent-up energy" through "shards of guitar and feedback" which "riccochet past your ear."[3] Guarisco also praises Joey Ramone's lead vocal for the way his snarling and pleading build to an angry peak in the refrain.[1]

"I Just Want to Have Something to Do" was included on several Ramones compilation albums, including Hey! Ho! Let's Go: The Anthology in 1999 and Greatest Hits in 2006.

17 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

The Damned are an English punk/goth band formed in London in 1976 by lead vocalist Dave Vanian, guitarist Brian James, bassist (and later guitarist) Captain Sensible, and drummer Rat Scabies.[2] They were the first punk rock band from the United Kingdom to release a single, "New Rose" (1976),[3] release an album, Damned Damned Damned (1977),[4] and tour the United States.[5] They have nine singles that charted on the UK Singles Chart Top 40.[6]

The band briefly broke up after Music for Pleasure (1977), the follow up to their debut album, was critically dismissed.[7] They quickly reformed without Brian James, and would release Machine Gun Etiquette (1979).[8] By the 1980s, they evolved into one of the forerunners of the gothic rock genre.[9] That decade they released four studio albums, The Black Album (1980), Strawberries (1982), Phantasmagoria (1985), and Anything (1986). The latter two albums did not feature Captain Sensible, who had left the band in 1984.[10] In 1988, James and Sensible rejoined to play what was said to be The Damned's final live show. This was released the next year as the live album Final Damnation.[11]

The Damned would again reform for a tour in 1991.[12] In 1995, they released a new album, Not of This Earth, which would be Scabies's last with the band.[13] This was followed by Grave Disorder (2001), and So, Who's Paranoid? (2008).

Despite going through numerous lineup changes, the current formation of Vanian, Sensible, keyboardist Monty Oxymoron, drummer Pinch and bassist Stu West, have been together since 2004.

The Damned played their first show on 6 July 1976, supporting the Sex Pistols at the 100 Club. A lo-fi recording of the show would later be released as Live at the 100 Club.[17] As part of London's burgeoning punk scene, The Damned again played the club on 20 September, for the 100 Club Punk Festival.[18]

On 22 October, five weeks before the release of the Sex Pistols' "Anarchy in the U.K.", Stiff Records put out The Damned's first single, "New Rose", thus making them the first UK punk band to release a single. The single's B-side was fast paced cover of The Beatles' "Help!".[19] New Rose was described by critic Ned Raggett as a "deathless anthem of nuclear-strength romantic angst".

"New Rose" was the first single by British punk rock group The Damned, released on 22 October 1976. It was the first single by a British punk group,[1] and was released in the Netherlands, Germany, and France in 1977.

Written by guitarist Brian James, "New Rose" was issued on the Stiff Records label. The B-side was a cover of The Beatles' hit "Help!", performed about twice as fast as the original. Both songs have since become staples of The Damned's live shows, and appear on various compilations, and "New Rose" was included on the group's full-length debut Damned Damned Damned. The deadpan intro by Vanian of "Is she really going out with him?" on "New Rose" pays homage to the 1964 Shangri-Las song "Leader of the Pack".

The single was reissued in Stiff's mail order Damned 4 Pack mail-order set. Original copies have a pressout centre, while re-issues have a solid centre. Copies from the fourpack have matrix details: "Bilbo tape" handwritten and "AY 50332" printed. A CD version was issued in the Stiff Singles 1976–1977 boxed set by Castle Music in 2003. "Help!" also appears on Hits Greatest Stiffs.

15 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

The Green Fuz were an American garage rock band in the late 1960s, best known for their sole single, "Green Fuz", which has become a classic of the genre and was covered by The Cramps. On the single, the band was identified as Randy Alvey & Green Fuz.

The group was formed in Bridgeport, Texas. The members were Randy Alvey (vocals), Mike Pearce (drums), Jimmy Mercer (rhythm guitar), Les Dale (lead guitar), and R.E. "Buck" Houchins (bass). Alvey and Pearce formed their first group, The Psychedelic Reactions, in 1967; after some personnel changes, they became The Green Fuz, named for Dale's green fuzz box. Alvey, Pearce and Houchins were later involved in another group, Natchez.

The Green Fuz played at dances and clubs, gaining enough local popularity to persuade the co-owner of Wash-Tex Records, Shorty Hendrix, to record their self-written theme song. The recording took place in a deserted roadside cafe, chosen for its acoustics, and was issued locally in 1969. It was not a success, largely because the primitive recording techniques led to a muffled sound, which has subsequently contributed to its cult appeal.

The record resurfaced on a prominent garage rock compilation album, Pebbles, Volume 2 in the late 1970s and has since appeared on many similar compilation albums. One of those albums, Acid Dreams Epitaph is subtitled 75 Minutes of Green Fuz. The band gained additional fans when "Green Fuz" was covered by The Cramps on their 1981 album Psychedelic Jungle.

The New Orleans roots music festival Ponderosa Stomp featured The Green Fuz in 2008, after the festival's founder, Dr. Ira Padnos, located Green Fuz lead guitarist Les Dale in Virginia Beach, VA, where he had retired after two decades in the U. S. Navy.

In 2009 the song "Green Fuz" was included by Evan Dando's The Lemonheads on their well-received covers album, Varshons. This version has a much slower tempo than either the original version or the Cramps version.

15 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

The Green Fuz were an American garage rock band in the late 1960s, best known for their sole single, "Green Fuz", which has become a classic of the genre and was covered by The Cramps. On the single, the band was identified as Randy Alvey & Green Fuz.

The group was formed in Bridgeport, Texas. The members were Randy Alvey (vocals), Mike Pearce (drums), Jimmy Mercer (rhythm guitar), Les Dale (lead guitar), and R.E. "Buck" Houchins (bass). Alvey and Pearce formed their first group, The Psychedelic Reactions, in 1967; after some personnel changes, they became The Green Fuz, named for Dale's green fuzz box. Alvey, Pearce and Houchins were later involved in another group, Natchez.

The Green Fuz played at dances and clubs, gaining enough local popularity to persuade the co-owner of Wash-Tex Records, Shorty Hendrix, to record their self-written theme song. The recording took place in a deserted roadside cafe, chosen for its acoustics, and was issued locally in 1969. It was not a success, largely because the primitive recording techniques led to a muffled sound, which has subsequently contributed to its cult appeal.

The record resurfaced on a prominent garage rock compilation album, Pebbles, Volume 2 in the late 1970s and has since appeared on many similar compilation albums. One of those albums, Acid Dreams Epitaph is subtitled 75 Minutes of Green Fuz. The band gained additional fans when "Green Fuz" was covered by The Cramps on their 1981 album Psychedelic Jungle.

The New Orleans roots music festival Ponderosa Stomp featured The Green Fuz in 2008, after the festival's founder, Dr. Ira Padnos, located Green Fuz lead guitarist Les Dale in Virginia Beach, VA, where he had retired after two decades in the U. S. Navy.

In 2009 the song "Green Fuz" was included by Evan Dando's The Lemonheads on their well-received covers album, Varshons. This version has a much slower tempo than either the original version or the Cramps version.

15 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

The Green Fuz were an American garage rock band in the late 1960s, best known for their sole single, "Green Fuz", which has become a classic of the genre and was covered by The Cramps. On the single, the band was identified as Randy Alvey & Green Fuz.

The group was formed in Bridgeport, Texas. The members were Randy Alvey (vocals), Mike Pearce (drums), Jimmy Mercer (rhythm guitar), Les Dale (lead guitar), and R.E. "Buck" Houchins (bass). Alvey and Pearce formed their first group, The Psychedelic Reactions, in 1967; after some personnel changes, they became The Green Fuz, named for Dale's green fuzz box. Alvey, Pearce and Houchins were later involved in another group, Natchez.

The Green Fuz played at dances and clubs, gaining enough local popularity to persuade the co-owner of Wash-Tex Records, Shorty Hendrix, to record their self-written theme song. The recording took place in a deserted roadside cafe, chosen for its acoustics, and was issued locally in 1969. It was not a success, largely because the primitive recording techniques led to a muffled sound, which has subsequently contributed to its cult appeal.

The record resurfaced on a prominent garage rock compilation album, Pebbles, Volume 2 in the late 1970s and has since appeared on many similar compilation albums. One of those albums, Acid Dreams Epitaph is subtitled 75 Minutes of Green Fuz. The band gained additional fans when "Green Fuz" was covered by The Cramps on their 1981 album Psychedelic Jungle.

The New Orleans roots music festival Ponderosa Stomp featured The Green Fuz in 2008, after the festival's founder, Dr. Ira Padnos, located Green Fuz lead guitarist Les Dale in Virginia Beach, VA, where he had retired after two decades in the U. S. Navy.

In 2009 the song "Green Fuz" was included by Evan Dando's The Lemonheads on their well-received covers album, Varshons. This version has a much slower tempo than either the original version or the Cramps version.

14 Sep
Published in Song of 2day

Conway Twitty (born Harold Lloyd Jenkins; September 1, 1933 – June 5, 1993) was an American musician and singer. He had success in the country, rock, R&B, and pop genres. He held the record for the most number one singles of any act, with 40 No. 1 Billboard country hits[citation needed], until George Strait broke the record in 2006. From 1971 to 1976, Twitty received a string of Country Music Association awards for duets with Loretta Lynn. Although never a member of the Grand Ole Opry, he was inducted into both the Country Music and Rockabilly Halls of Fame.

Accounts of how Harold Jenkins acquired his stage name of Conway Twitty vary. Allegedly, in 1957, Jenkins decided that his real name wasn't marketable and sought a better show business name. In The Billboard Book of Number One Hits Fred Bronson states that the singer was looking at a road map when he spotted Conway, Arkansas, and Twitty, Texas, and chose the name Conway Twitty.

Another account says that Jenkins met a Richmond, Virginia, man named W. Conway Twitty Jr. through Jenkins' manager in a New York City restaurant. The manager served in the US Army with the real Conway Twitty. Later, the manager suggested to Jenkins that he take the name as his stage name because it had a ring to it. In the mid-1960s, W. Conway Twitty subsequently recorded the song "What's in a Name but Trouble", lamenting the loss of his name to Harold Jenkins.

In 1958 using his new stage name, Conway Twitty's fortunes improved while he was with MGM Records, and an Ohio radio station had an inspiration, refraining from playing "I'll Try" (an MGM single that went nowhere in terms of sales, radio play, and jukebox play), instead playing the B-side, "It's Only Make Believe", a song written between sets by Twitty and drummer Jack Nance when they were in Hamilton, Ontario, playing at the Flamingo Lounge.[2] The record took nearly one year to reach and stay at the top spot on the Billboard pop music charts in the US, as well as No. 1 in 21 other countries, becoming the first of nine top 40 hits for Twitty. It sold over four million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.[3] That same year, country singer Tabby West of ABC-TV's Ozark Jubilee heard Twitty and booked him to appear on the show.[1]

For a brief period, due to voice similarities, some believed "It's Only Make Believe" was actually recorded by Elvis Presley, using "Conway Twitty" as a pseudonym. Twitty would go on to enjoy rock and roll success with songs including "Danny Boy" (Pop No. 10) and "Lonely Blue Boy" (Pop No. 6). "Lonely Blue Boy", originally titled "Danny", was recorded by Presley for the film King Creole but was not used in the soundtrack.

In June 1993, Twitty became ill while performing at the Jim Stafford Theatre in Branson, Missouri, and was in pain while he was on his tour bus. He died in Springfield, Missouri, at Cox South Hospital, from an abdominal aortic aneurysm, aged 59, two months before the release of what would be his final studio album, Final Touches. Four months after Twitty's death, George Jones included a cover of "Hello Darlin'" on his album High-Tech Redneck.

Twitty is buried at Sumner Memorial Gardens in Gallatin, Tennessee in a red granite vault, under the name "Harold L. Jenkins". There is space reserved next to him for his wife.

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