Friday, 16 March 2018 10:21

Truth and Janey - Down the Road I Go

Not to be dismissed because of its underground status, Truth and Janey's only LP, No Rest for the Wicked, was another incredible find for indie record label Monster Records, which has always specialized in digging up long-forgotten American hard rock nuggets from the '70s, but really struck gold this time around.
Published in Song of 2day
Blue Öyster Cult was the thinking man's heavy metal group. Put together on a college campus by a couple of rock critics, it maintained a close relationship with a series of literary figures (often in the fields of science fiction and horror), including Eric Von Lustbader, Patti Smith, Michael Moorcock, and Stephen King, while turning out some of the more listenable metal music of the early and mid-'70s. The band that became Blue Öyster Cult was organized in 1967 at Stony Brook College on Long Island by students (and later rock critics) Sandy Pearlman and Richard Meltzer as Soft White Underbelly and consisted of Andy Winters (bass), Donald "Buck Dharma" Roeser (guitar), John Wiesenthal -- quickly replaced by Allen Lanier -- (keyboards), and Albert Bouchard (drums), with Pearlman managing and Pearlman and Meltzer writing songs. Initially without a lead singer, they added Les Bronstein on vocals. This quintet signed to Elektra Records and recorded an album that was never released. They then dropped Bronstein and replaced him with their road manager, Eric Bloom, as the band's name was changed to Oaxaca. A second Elektra album also went unreleased, though a single was issued under the name the Stalk-Forrest Group. Cut loose by Elektra, they changed their name again, to Blue Öyster Cult, and signed to Columbia Records in late 1971, by which time Winters had been replaced by Albert Bouchard's brother Joe. Blue Öyster Cult, their debut album, was released in January 1972 and made the lower reaches of the charts.
Published in Song of 2day
Friday, 10 November 2017 11:06

Gotham City - Swords and Chains

GOTHAM CITY was formed 1980 in the Swedish city Umeå, they released their first demo in 1981 which featured members: Ola Ohlsson - Vocals, Mårten Edlund - Guitar, Björn Erik Melander - Bass and Jonas Östman - Drums. The song "Borderline" was later included on their 'The Unknown' album with changed lyrics. Some of the other songs would also show up on the 1983 EP 'Black Writs'. In 1982 they released the cult single 'Gotham City / Killer Angels' on Brute Force records limited to 300 copies. There is also a bootlegged versions of this 7" on clear vinyl. A year later they would put out their last recorded material with vocalist Ola Ohlsson; the EP 'Black Writs' which was recorded in February at Tonteknik Studios, engineered by Per Sorlin. Later in 1983 Ola Ohlsson leaves GOTHAM CITY and Anders Zackrisson takes over as the vocalist, a 9-track demo is recorded. In 1984 the monster is released; their first and only full-lenght album "The Unknown". This would also be their last official release. The song "The Beast Will Burn" from the album was also featured on the compilation album 'The Great Metal Attack Part 1 (1984)'. http://www.fwoshm.com/index/G/35-gotham-city-swe
Published in Song of 2day
Monday, 06 November 2017 10:24

Saxon - Denim And Leather

[...]This album is packed full of brilliant guitar work, and the solos are some of the greatest you will ever find in metal. They are fast, rapid fire solos, that slam you in the face and don't stop pounding away until the album is over and you are left a quivering wreck. Their quest is simple, to riff and solo until your eyes begin to bleed and fall out of your skull. And they pull it off amazingly, they sound fresh and stylish the whole way through, there are no boring riffs to be found on this album. There are many great things about this album. Everything is done brilliantly and there is not a single note out of place. The drumming remains amazing from track to track, with Gill beating away at a brilliant exhausting pace. Dawson also keeps up toe to toe, pounding away with his four string. There are no ballads or anything less than 100% metal. Saxon's style is simple, a powerful rhythm section and vocals combined with tremendous twin lead guitars, a style made famous by Judas Priest and done excellently on this album.[...] http://www.sputnikmusic.com/review/56484/Saxon-Denim-and-Leather/
Published in Song of 2day
Sunday, 22 October 2017 10:14

Freeways - One for the Road

Outstanding hard rock from Canada. Freeways take influence from the hard sounds of the mid to late 1970s, showing a nod to bands like Thin Lizzy, UFO, and Blue Oyster Cult. However is is no tribute act, on Cold Front the band has already developed a strong sound of their own, and with a debut release this strong the band has a promising future!
Published in Song of 2day
Thursday, 19 October 2017 10:07

Scorpions - Hell Cat

Doesn’t everyone just love Scorpions? I don’t mean the insectile beasts that sting with their ferocious bite or the Spider-Man villain, but rather the great 70s and 80s rock group that rocked the world with their smooth hooks and catchy tunes. People mostly know them for their later material where they sold their souls for money, but what those poor fools are missing out on is the brilliance of the material when Uli Jon Roth was handling the lead guitar duties. And as such…Virgin Killer.
Published in Song of 2day
Remember the good old days when thrash spoke to every unhappy degenerate forced to take a piss as Big Brother stood by watching? It was a time when metalheads rose to the occasion, spoke to people better than even our greatest orators, and made a stand against crooked politicians. It was a time when being a rebel stood for something and tearing each other apart in circle pits and walls-of-death was the greatest form of therapy. OK, so that’s not exactly how many remembered the ’80s thrash craze. But, bands like Anthrax, Exodus, Metallica, and Testament spoke to at least one pissed-off kid that used them to fuel his anger. I was that pissed-off kid, even though I didn’t know what I was so pissed off about. Not to mention I didn’t have any reason to be. But, goddammit, I was part of the movement. Even if I had no idea what the fuck that meant either. I guess you just had to be there. And, if you weren’t, feel free to go back to your shoegazing while the rest of the boys and I get on a Power Trip. source: http://www.angrymetalguy.com/power-trip-nightmare-logic-review/
Published in Song of 2day
Sunday, 24 September 2017 18:20

Metallica - Jump In The Fire

This song is written from the perspective of The Devil. He tempts people with sin and waits as they die and enter hell, which is where they "jump in the fire." One of the earliest Metallica songs, this was the second single they released, after "Whiplash." Dave Mustaine, who left the band in 1983, helped write the song, earning one of his four composer credits in Metallica. The song was included on Metallica's debut album, Kill 'Em All, and reflects the band's New Wave influences; drummer Lars Ulrich was quoted as saying that the song was inspired by Iron Maiden, whose hit "Run To The Hills" had been the most popular song on the radio at the time. Lars claimed that "Jump in the Fire" was Metallica's response to "Run to the Hills," and was intended to be their breakthrough single.
Published in Song of 2day
Thursday, 21 September 2017 09:35

Diamond Head - Lightning to the Nations

"Lightning to the Nations" is the title track from Diamond Head's self-released 1980 album. Lyrics are written by Diamond Head lead Sean Harris, instrumentation is pretty much a collaboration of the entire band (at the time) of Sean Harris, Colin Kimberly, Duncan Scott, and Brian Tatler. Listening to the electrifying guitar work, it's easy to see why heavy metal magazine Burn! ranked Lightning to the Nations the third best riff album of all time, just after Black Sabbath's Master of Reality and Slayer's Reign in Blood. How old were the band members when this song was recorded? Tatler, Scott, and Harris were 19, Kimberly was 20. Says Harris of this time: "We didn't know s--t." Unfortunately, their inexperience was taken advantage of by their manager Reg Fellows. Fellows, who owned a cardboard factory, was responsible for the low-quality first album issue (aka "The White Label Album"), and would go around afterwards reselling the album under various names (Am I Evil?, To Heaven From Hell, Behold the Beginning), even with different cover artwork. The band has since been vocal in protesting how they'd been exploited. [...] http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=18888
Published in Song of 2day
Wednesday, 20 September 2017 10:15

KISS - 100.000 Years

This song begins with a bass riff by Gene Simmons. He recalled the story of the song to Classic Rock magazine: "I read a book called 100,000 Years where 100,000 years ago we were visited by aliens," he said. "Also Einstein's theory of relativity. I was reading all kinds of space and time continuance stuff, and it was all swirling around my head." "I showed this stuff to Paul (Stanley), and he's going: 'What's 100,000 years?' I said: 'Let's just try it.' And then Paul came up with some stuff and I added the riff." http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=32834
Published in Song of 2day
Page 1 of 2
You are here: