stoperithorio

stoperithorio

30 Mar
Published in Song of 2day
A relatively unknown German post-punk band, Cyan Revue had three releases between 1984 and 1987. THE GIFT (1984) FOUR WOUNDS (1986) ARM (1987) Singer Tobias Grubens died in 1996.
26 Mar
Published in Song of 2day
The Carpenters[1] were an American vocal and instrumental duo consisting of siblings Karen and Richard Carpenter. Producing a distinctively soft musical style, they became among the best-selling music artists of all time. During their 14-year career, the Carpenters recorded 11 albums, 31 singles, five television specials, and a short-lived television series. Their career ended in 1983 by Karen's death from heart failure brought on by complications of anorexia. Extensive news coverage surrounding the circumstances of her death increased public awareness of eating disorders.[2][3] The duo's brand of melodic pop produced a record-breaking run of hit recordings on the American Top 40 and Adult Contemporary charts, and they became leading sellers in the soft rock, easy listening and adult contemporary genres. The Carpenters had three No. 1 singles and five No. 2 singles on the Billboard Hot 100 and fifteen No. 1 hits on the Adult Contemporary chart. In addition, they had twelve top 10 singles. To date, the Carpenters' album and single sales total more than 100 million units. Richard Carpenter was the creative force behind the Carpenter sound.[5] An accomplished keyboard player, composer and arranger, music critic Daniel Levitin called Richard Carpenter "one of the most gifted arrangers to emerge in popular music."[6] In a period when contemporary music was dominated by heavy rock, their smooth harmonies were not in step with the trends of the day.[7] The sound the Carpenters were going for was rich and melodic, along the same vein as the harmonies found in their contemporaries The Beach Boys and the The Mamas & the Papas, but with greater fullness and orchestration.[8] Most of Richard's arrangements were classical in style, with frequent use of strings and occasional brass and woodwind instruments as well. Richard's work with Karen was heavily influenced by the music of Les Paul, whose overdubbing of the voice of partner Mary Ford allowed her to be used as both the lead and harmonizing vocals.[7] By use of multi-tracked recordings, Richard was able to use Karen and himself for the harmonies to back Karen's lead. The overdubbed background harmonies were distinctive to the Carpenters, but it was the soulful, engaging sound of Karen's lead voice that made them so recognizable. Karen did not possess a powerful singing voice, but when miked closely she conveyed a great deal of feeling. Tight miking required perfect pitch, which came easily to her. Richard Coles, a musician and broadcaster, commented: "No singer is so closely miked up so unforgivingly as Karen Carpenter. That is frightening for singers because the closer the microphone the more unforgiving it is in exposing the weaknesses in a singer's voice."[8] Karen's contralto voice was warm and distinctive. Though her vocal range spanned three octaves,[9] Richard arranged their music to take advantage of the rich quality of Karen's lower range.[10] Many of the Carpenters' songs are in the keys of D ("You", "There's a Kind of Hush (All Over the World)"), E flat ("Only Yesterday"), E ("Hurting Each Other", "Yesterday Once More"), F ("I'll Never Fall in Love Again"), and G ("And When He Smiles", "Reason to Believe", "For All We Know", "You'll Love Me"). On February 3, 1983, Karen visited her parents. The following morning, February 4, her mother found her lying unresponsive on the floor of a walk-in closet. After they spent 20 minutes in a waiting room, a doctor entered to tell Richard and his parents that Karen was dead. The autopsy stated that Karen's death was caused by emetine cardiotoxicity resulting from anorexia nervosa. Under the anatomical summary, the first item was heart failure, with anorexia as second. The third finding was cachexia, which is extremely low weight and weakness and general body decline associated with chronic disease. Emetine cardiotoxicity implied that Karen abused ipecac syrup, although there was no evidence to suggest that Karen abused it as her brother and family never found ipecac vials in her apartment, even after her death.[51] At her funeral, more than a thousand mourners turned up, among them her friends Dorothy Hamill, Olivia Newton-John, Petula Clark, Dionne Warwick and Herb Alpert. "Superstar" is a 1969 song written by Bonnie Bramlett and Leon Russell (with a songwriting credit also given to Delaney Bramlett[1]) that has been a hit for many artists in different genres and interpretations in the years since; the best-known version is by the Carpenters in 1971.In its first recorded incarnation, the song was called "Groupie (Superstar)," and was recorded and released as a B-side to the Delaney & Bonnie single "Comin' Home" in December 1969. Released by Atlantic Records, the full credit on the single was to Delaney & Bonnie and Friends Featuring Eric Clapton.
23 Mar
Published in Song of 2day
The Like was an alternative rock band from Los Angeles, California. Its final lineup consisted of Z Berg (vocals and guitar), Tennessee Thomas (drums), Laena Geronimo (bass), and Annie Monroe (organ). The band released three extended plays (EPs) and two studio albums.The Like were formed in September 2001 by Z Berg (vocals/guitar), Charlotte Froom (bass/vocals) and Tennessee Thomas (drums) at the ages of 15, 15 and 16, respectively. All three are daughters of music industry veterans; Berg's father is former Geffen Records A&R exec/record producer Tony Berg, Froom's father is producer Mitchell Froom and Thomas' father is Pete Thomas, longtime drummer for Elvis Costello.[2] From childhood, Froom, Berg and Thomas were immersed in classic rock, and all three took piano lessons before teaching themselves their current instruments. They formed when the parents of childhood friends Thomas and Froom learned that Berg had been writing songs and showed interest in forming a band. Froom learned bass two weeks before joining, and the three began working together, getting fast results. Thomas's mother came up with the name in recognition of how often the girls used the word "like".[3] Over a period of three years, the band independently released three EPs (I Like The Like, ... and The Like, and Like It or Not), which they sold at shows and on their website. Their song "(So I'll Sit Here) Waiting" was featured on the soundtrack of the film Thirteen. They toured with Phantom Planet and Kings of Leon. In 2004, the Like signed to Geffen Records.The Like released their first album, Are You Thinking What I'm Thinking?, through Geffen on September 13, 2005. The album is a combination of reworked songs previously released on their independent EPs as well as new material. The reviews were generally positive.[4] Krissi Murison of the NME had praise for such songs as "June Gloom" and "(So I'll Sit Here) Waiting", but criticized the "over-polished approach" of producer Wendy Melvoin.[5] The band performed at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in April 2006 and at the Wireless Festival in Hyde Park, London in June 2006. In September 2006, the Like supported Muse on a short string of tour dates in the U.S., before heading to Europe to support UK band Razorlight.Berg and Thomas went to Brooklyn, New York to record the Like's second album. (Froom had recently left the band.)[6] They worked with producer Mark Ronson, as well as Alex Greenwald and various members of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings. Departing from the sound of Are You Thinking What I'm Thinking?, they were inspired by the music of classic girl groups, British invasion acts, and 1960s female songwriters.[7] Greenwald played the bass guitar on all tracks. On September 17, 2009, the band posted a message entitled "The Like 2.0" on their MySpace blog. The message announced a new lineup: founding members Berg and Thomas, plus new members Reni Lane and Laena Geronimo.[8] This lineup toured with Arctic Monkeys in September and October 2009.[9] Reni Lane has since left the band and been replaced by current band member Annie Monroe. Downtown Records released the album, entitled Release Me, on June 15, 2010. USA Today called it a "vast improvement" over Are You Thinking What I'm Thinking?[10] Los Angeles magazine noted that the band "has gone retro-fab, with Farfisa organ, jangly Brit-pop guitar, and hand claps."[11] Jon Pareles of The New York Times wrote, "The tough girl group is hardly a new concept—ask Blondie or the Donnas—but done right, like this, it's irresistible."[12] The band starred in a short film commissioned by designer Zac Posen as a way to promote his Target fashion collection. The film shows the band hanging out in a hotel room and then performing the single "Fair Game". The film was directed by Gia Coppola (granddaughter of Francis Ford Coppola).[13] The Like also appeared as themselves in an October 2010 episode of the TV series 90210,[14] and in issue 3 of the The Li'l Depressed Boy comic book.On May 25, 2011, the band posted the following message on its official Facebook page: "The Like have cancelled all their upcoming shows, and the band is currently on an indefinite hiatus. There is no further statement from the band at this time."[16] On October 20, 2013, without officially acknowledging the status of their hiatus, the band posted via Twitter that on the twenty-fifth they will be playing a show at the Liquid Room in Tokyo, Japan.
12 Mar
Published in Song of 2day
Babes in Toyland is an American punk rock band formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1987. The band was formed by Oregon native Kat Bjelland (lead vocals and guitar), with Lori Barbero (drums) and Michelle Leon (bass), who was later replaced by Maureen Herman in 1992. Between 1989 and 1995, Babes in Toyland released three studio albums; Spanking Machine (1990), the commercially successful Fontanelle (1992), and Nemesisters (1995), before becoming inactive in 1997 and eventually disbanding in 2001. While the band was inspirational to some performers in the riot grrrl movement in the Pacific Northwest, Babes in Toyland never associated themselves with the movement. In August 2014, Babes In Toyland announced that they would be reuniting. Babes in Toyland formed in 1987, after frontwoman Kat Bjelland met drummer Lori Barbero at a friend's barbecue. Originally from Woodburn, Oregon and a former resident of San Francisco, Bjelland had moved to Minneapolis to form a band.[2] Over the following months, Bjelland convinced Barbero to play drums and formed Babes in Toyland in winter 1987. In its initial formation in 1987, in addition to Bjelland and Barbero, the band included Kris Holetz on bass and singer Cindy Russell.[3] It has been widely believed that, following the departures of Holetz and Russell, the band briefly recruited Bjelland's friend - and former bandmate of the band Pagan Babies - Courtney Love on bass. However, it is known that Love had lied to the press on multiple occasions about her involvement with the band. Love, who later went on to form the successful band Hole, only stood in Minneapolis a number of weeks before leaving as she was not in the band, but rather a roommate of Barbero's. She then stole money from the band and left Minneapolis. Bjelland, in an interview, once stated: “Courtney practiced with Babes in Toyland only once, and it sucked. After that, it was like ‘Bye, Courtney.’” "Bruise Violet" is the second single by Babes in Toyland from their album, Fontanelle In an interview, Bjelland was asked if the song "Bruise Violet" was written about Courtney Love, since one of Hole's hits was entitled "Violet". Her response was no, firstly because "Violet" was released two years later (though Hole had been playing the song regularly since 1991), and secondly that Violet was a muse that both she and Love wrote about. It was released on purple 7" vinyl[1] and features early or not produced versions of the song.
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