stoperithorio

stoperithorio

17 Mar
Published in Song of 2day
David Ian "Joe" Jackson (born 11 August 1954) is an English musician and singer-songwriter.[2] Having spent years studying music and playing clubs, he scored a hit with his first release, "Is She Really Going Out with Him?", in 1979. It was followed by a number of new wave singles, before he moved to more jazz-inflected pop music and had a Top 10 hit in 1982 with "Steppin' Out". Jackson is associated with the 1980s Second British Invasion of the US.[3] He has also composed classical music. He has recorded 20 studio albums and received five Grammy Award nominations.[4] Contents
13 Mar
Published in Song of 2day
The Sound were an English post-punk band, formed in South London in 1979 and dissolved in 1988. They were fronted by Adrian Borland, and evolved from his previous band, the Outsiders. While never commercially successful, the Sound have long been championed by critics.
11 Mar
Published in Song of 2day
The Slits were a punk and post-punk band formed in London in 1976 by members of the groups the Flowers of Romance and the Castrators. The group's early line-up consisted of Ari Up (Ariane Forster) and Palmolive (a.k.a. Paloma Romero, who played briefly with Spizzenergi and later left to join the Raincoats), with Viv Albertine and Tessa Pollitt replacing founding members Kate Korus and Suzy Gutsy.[1] Their 1979 debut album, Cut, has been called one of the defining releases of the post-punk era.
10 Mar
Published in Song of 2day
Mink DeVille (1974–86) was a rock band known for its association with early punk rock bands at New York's CBGB nightclub and for being a showcase for the music of Willy DeVille. The band recorded six albums in the years 1977 to 1985. Except for frontman Willy DeVille, the original members of the band played only on the first two albums (Cabretta and Return to Magenta). For the remaining albums and for tours, Willy DeVille assembled musicians to play under the name Mink DeVille. After 1985, when Willy DeVille began recording and touring under his own name, his backup bands were sometimes called "The Mink DeVille Band," an allusion to the earlier Mink DeVille.
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